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Best 50mm lenses


Best 50mm lenses for Canon in 2022 (8 Top Picks)

Ahh, the good old nifty-fifty–such a classic lens! The 50mm prime is a quintessential piece of equipment every photographer should own at least once in their lifetime. And, today we’re looking at the best 50mm for Canon mount cameras:

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Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 STM Bestseller

Wide f/1.8 aperture, Continuous AF for movies, Great for portraits, action, and nighttime photography;

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Sigma 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art for Canon Our Pick

Very sharp at F1.4, Pro level all-around performer, Fast and accurate focus;

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Canon 50mm f/1.2L USM Also Great

Fastest and widest aperture 50mm lens from Canon.

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Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM

A good budget pick for Canon full frame cameras.

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Sigma 50mm f/1.4 EX DG HSM Canon Mount

Creates sharp images with high contrast, Large Aperture, Very affordable;

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Zeiss Milvus 50mm f/1.4 ZE

Very sharp lens, Manual focus design, Weather-resistant construction;

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Yongnuo YN50mm f/1.4

Faster than the f/1.8 lens. Value for money.

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Yongnuo YN50 f/1.8

A Great third party option: Fast aperture. Value for money.

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Best

50mm Lenses for Canon:
  • 1. Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 STM
  • 2. Sigma 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art
  • 3. Canon 50mm f/1.2L USM
  • 4. Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM
  • 5. Sigma 50mm f/1.4 EX DG HSM Canon Mount
  • 6. Zeiss Milvus 50mm f/1.4 ZE
  • 7. Yongnuo YN50 f/1.8
  • 8. Yongnuo YN50mm f/1.4

If you’re a Nikon shooter, don’t worry, just check our post on the best Nikon 50mm lenses.

When you buy through links on our site, we may earn a commission at no cost to you. We evaluate products independently. Commissions do not affect our evaluations.

1. Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 STM

Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 STM

The 50mm f/1.8 is a neat little package for the budget photographer. At under $150 it is the cheapest EF lens that you could buy right now.

Aside from its great quality, one of the biggest advantages of the lens is the STM auto-focusing motor. This is one of the first lenses to have this particular AF motor. The STM technology is geared to work in tandem with Canon’s dual pixel CMOS auto-focusing. That makes this a great choice for shooting video.

Related Post: STM vs USM Lenses – What’s the Difference?

In terms of build quality and weather sealing, this is not the finest. It’s primarily made of plastic, with only the lens mount made up of metal. The overall weight is under 1-pound. Which, consequently, should be a giveaway of the build quality.

The 50mm f/1.8 STM contains 6 elements arranged in 5 groups. There’s no image stabilization on the lens. The lens diaphragm is made of 7 rounded diaphragm blades, which, to be honest, is good enough. We pick this as the best 50mm for Canon on a budget.

2. Sigma 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art

After much deliberations, we decided upon the best 50mm for Canon. The Sigma 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art lens!

This Sigma gives the Carl Zeiss Milvus (listed below) a run for its money.

Sigma 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art

Some words on the build quality of the lens. Seriously, the Sigma 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM A is a well-built lens. It is made out of thermally stable composite material. The dimensions of the lens stay the same regardless of the temperature in which it operates.

It consists of a total of 13 elements arranged in 8 groups. This includes three special low dispersion elements. Consists of 9 rounded aperture blades that form the nice rounded aperture diaphragm. At 815 grams it is a shade under the Zeiss Milvus 50mm f/1.4 ZE.

The lens has a ring-type auto-focusing mechanism. Plus, full-time manual focusing override.

Sigma’s Art series lenses have always inspired and excited us. The 50mm f/1.4 is no different. As a matter of fact, it beats the smaller sibling to the best lens for Canon EF mount.

3. Canon 50mm f/1.2L USM

Canon EF 50mm f/1.2 L USM Lens for Canon Digital SLR Cameras

The fastest, the widest aperture 50mm lens in the Canon stable, the Canon 50mm f/1.2L USM is a fantastic lens to work with. Sure it is pricey. It is pricier than even some of the telephoto lenses that Canon makes. But at the end of the day, you get a wide-open aperture of f/1.2.

There is, however, a catch in all these. The wide-open aperture of f/1.2 can also give you a lot of problems when nailing focus. The slightest bit of hand movement, or your body leaning forward or backward at the precise moment you push the shutter release, can cause image blur.

Notwithstanding, if you can manage shooting with such wide aperture lenses you would love the quality of bokeh produced by the massive wide aperture and the 8 rounded aperture blades.

Construction of the lens includes a total of 8 elements arranged in 6 groups. It includes one aspherical element. Additionally, the lens also has a Super Spectra coating to ensure the suppression of ghosting and flares in poor lighting conditions.

Size-wise the lens dwarfs the likes of the 50mm f/1.8 STM. It is heavier too. And that brings us to the build quality of the lens. This lens comes with weather sealing. It is not going to be affected by the vagaries of Mother Nature. A little bit of drizzle or a little bit of snow, nothing will impact the lens.

Our Pick

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Canon 50mm f/1.2L USM

Best 50mm for Canon

Fast aperture. Superb image quality.

$1,399.00 from Amazon

4. Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM

Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM Standard and Medium Telephoto Lens for Canon SLR Cameras

Canon has a less expensive 50mm prime. The Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM. That one is significantly cheaper than the f/1.2 L USM that we just read about. But just being one-third stop slower doesn’t make it a deal-breaker. On the contrary, we feel that if you don’t need an f/1.2 lens then there is no point in spending an obscene amount of money.

The EF 50mm f/1.4 USM is a simple construction. It consists of 7 elements arranged in 6 groups. The lens features a Gaussian optics design. It includes two high refractive index elements. These elements are responsible for the suppression of spherical aberrations and other distortions. Super Spectra coating has also been used for suppressing lens flare and ghosting increasing overall contrast and color rendition in the final images.

The aperture diaphragm is composed of eight rounded blades. The quality of the bokeh is surprisingly good. One of the primary reasons you would want to use a fast prime is so that you can use the maximum aperture to produce wild background blur. Completely obliterating the background and thereby bringing the subject into prominence in the image.

This technique also helps you when the background isn’t necessarily interesting and adds nothing to the entire composition. Normally, you wouldn’t want to completely blur out a background if it is half-interesting. Slightly out of focus, yes. But completely blurred out, no.

Best Budget Pick

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Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM

Best Budget Pick for your Canon Full-frame

Excellent aperture. Value for money. Great image quality.

$399.00 from Amazon

5. Sigma 50mm f/1.4 EX DG HSM Canon Mount

The Sigma 50mm f/1.4 EX DG HSM is great auto-focus lens for those of you who want a lens with an AF motor.

Plus, you have full-time manual focusing override. Full-time manual focusing override allows you the advantage to tweak the focus manually. This is even when auto-focusing mode is engaged.

Sigma art lenses are an affordable way to get an art lens.

Let’s take a look at the construction of the lens.

The lens is composed of 8 elements arranged in 6 groups. This includes 1 aspherical element. The 9 rounded diaphragm blades create a beautiful round aperture opening.

The front element of the lens is quite large. Not surprising since the lens uses a 77mm filter thread. For a 50mm prime, this is quite big.

This is one of the lighter constructions on this list. Weighing just 1.1 pounds, it’s at par with some of the other lenses on our list of best 50mm for Canon mount cameras.

But the build quality is not at par. Unfortunately, this is not a weather-sealed construction.

6. Zeiss Milvus 50mm f/1.4 ZE

Zeiss Milvus 50mm f/1.4 ZE. The lens has a sleek profile and is built tough.

Let me start off by saying, this Zeiss lens is designed like a tank. The lens has a total of 10 elements arranged in 8 groups. All of which are perfectly protected by the lens’ completely weather sealed design.

Something to keep in mind, however, is this is a manual focus lens. That means no auto-focus, which could be a deal breaker for some.

Distortion is very minimal if any. If you shoot charts inside a studio you would see a slight amount of barrel distortion. But that’s negligible and easily corrected in post-production.

On the flip side, you do can exactly the same thing with the Sigma 50mm f/1.4 that you could do with the Zeiss Milvus. And at a cheaper price and a less bulkiness to boot.

For many photographers, the lack of auto-focusing is the end of discussion. There are plenty of photography moments where you need accurate fast focus lock. Moments where there is no time to dilly-dolly with a manual focusing ring. This is where the Zeiss Milvus narrowly misses out on the crown of the best 50mm for Canon.

7. Yongnuo YN50 f/1.

8 YONGNUO YN50mm F1.8 Lens

Yongnuo makes some decent photo accessories including continuous lighting, triggers, flashes, and lenses. The Yongnuo YN50 comes with a maximum aperture of f/1.8. It is quite a fast lens. In even reasonable quantity light you can use it to produce beautiful background blur. You can completely obliterate the background, thereby bringing the subject into prominence.

Nighttime photography with such wide aperture lenses is very easy. They capture several stops of additional light when compared to similar kit lenses. That allows you to use faster Shutter Speed and capture sharper images in any kind of lighting situation.

This particular lens is a rather simple construction. It consists of only 6 elements arranged in 5 groups. There is a multi-coated glass element that ensures that the lens is able to counter flares and ghosting when shooting with the sun lower at the horizon.

The aperture diaphragm is composed of a total of seven aperture blades. The quality of the bokeh is decent but not comparable to the Canon EF 50mm f/1.2L USM.

Great Third-party Pick

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Yongnuo YN50 f/1.8

Great third party option

Fast aperture. Value for money.

$82.00 from Amazon

8. Yongnuo YN50mm f/1.4

YONGNUO Standard Prime Lens YN50mm F1.4 AF/MF 0.45M Lens

Yongnuo also has a f/1.4 lens for the Canon EF mount. This is a slightly more expensive lens. Costing almost three times the price that you pay for the f/1.8 lens. But you also get one-third additional light when shooting. So if that additional one-third light is absolutely important for you, go for it by all means.

If that additional light is something that you can manage using a slightly higher ISO number or using the exposure sliders in your favorite photo editing software then there is no reason to pay extra.

Let’s talk about the construction of the lens and the composite elements. The lens has a total of 9 elements arranged in 7 groups.

The construction of the lens includes four ultra-high refractive index elements. These elements ensure that the lens is not plagued by distortions and aberrations too much.

Additionally, a multi-layer coating has also been used. This takes care of lens flares and ghosting. Especially when working in difficult lighting situations.

Aperture diaphragm is composed of seven blades. Bokeh quality is nice but we still prefer the Canon EF 50mm f/1.2L that we listed here.

Excellent Choice

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Yongnuo YN50mm f/1.4

Fast aperture

Faster than the f/1.8 lens. Value for money.

$185.00 from Amazon

Conclusion – Which one is “the Best”?

A 50mm lens is the standard prime for 35mm format cameras. This versatile piece of optics delivers when it comes to shooting every day, street, events, and family photos. Choosing the best 50mm for Canon shouldn’t be too difficult as all the lenses we’ve listed here are outstanding.

First, just establish your budget and narrow down your choices that way. Then decide on what’s important to you.

  • Is it build tough enough for your usage habits?
  • Do you need autofocus and so forth?

Before long, you’ll have chosen the perfect lens to add to your collection.

Did we miss one? Let us know what your favorite 50mm for Canon lens is in the comments below!


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The Best 50mm Lenses for Nikon Cameras (Our Top 5 Picks)

How do you select the best 50mm lens for Nikon cameras? For one thing, a good prime lens has to be sharp. However, sharpness is not the only yardstick to judge a lens by!

Overall image quality, ease of handling, build quality, and price are some of the other key factors to consider when choosing the best 50mm lens.

In this article, we look at Nikkor lenses as well as third-party 50mm primes, to save you the time spent chasing down the ideal Nikon 50mm lens.

If you are a Canon User, check out the Best 50mm Lenses for Canon.

The Best 50mm Lenses for Nikon

  • 1. Nikon 50mm f/1.8G AF-S
  • 2. Nikon AF-S 50mm f/1.4G Bundle 
  • 3. Nikon Z 50mm f/1.8 S
  • 4. Sigma 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art Lens
  • 5. Zeiss Milvus 50mm f/1.4

When you buy through links on our site, we may earn a commission at no cost to you. We evaluate products independently. Commissions do not affect our evaluations.

1. Nikon 50mm f/1.8G AF-S

OUR PICK

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Nikon 50mm f/1.8G AF-S

A great choice for Nikon full-frame DSLRs

This lens offers great image quality and handling at a reasonable price

$216.95 from Amazon

Pros

Good build quality

Excellent optical performance

Sharp in center even at widest aperture

Silent wave focusing motor

Cons

Some barrel distortion

The Nikon 50mm f/1. 8G AF-S is an update to Nikon’s revered 50mm f/1.8G, and it has some big boots to fill, considering that the older D version is thought to be one of Nikon’s sharpest lenses.

One welcome addition to the new design 50mm f/1.4G AF-S lens is Nikon’s silent wave focusing motor. This means it will autofocus on entry-level Nikon bodies like the D3100 and D5100. It will also work with older Nikons like the D40 or D60 that lack a built-in focusing motor.

Although this lens is lightweight, it’s very well built. The lens mount is metal, and it has a rubber gasket to help keep dust and moisture out of the camera. Nikon, however, makes no claims about weather-sealing in the rest of the lens.

The 50mm f/1.8G doesn’t extend during focusing, which means it’s great for using with graduated or polarizing filters because it doesn’t rotate. Autofocus is fast, and you can make manual adjustments easily if you wish.

As far as image quality goes, this lens is very good. Even when shooting at f/1. 8, the sharpness in the center of the frame is excellent. Peak sharpness can be found between f/5.6 and f/8, but sharpness at all other apertures is good too. Chromatic aberrations and flare are handled very well, but there is a touch more barrel distortion than there should be. However, the distortion is easily remedied in image editing software.

While it’s not the cheapest 50mm lens out there, it’s very reasonably priced considering the build and optical quality. This is an ideal 50mm lens for a beginner, as it can be paired happily with an entry-level or older Nikon DSLR body as well as newer ones. You will find this lens is super-versatile, and it works especially well as a portrait and food photography lens.

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I think it certainly lives up to the reputation of its predecessor, and it’s my top choice for the best 50mm lens for Nikon cameras.

2. Nikon AF-S 50mm f/1.4G Bundle 

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Nikon AF-S 50mm f/1.4G Bundle

A good choice for professional photographers

This lens offers outstanding image quality and sharpness throughout, and is great for shooting in low light situations

$440. 95 from Amazon

Pros

Outstanding image quality

Great for low-light shooting

Great build quality

Good bokeh

Cons

Autofocus isn’t as fast as some other 50mm lenses

If you want an extra stop of light, the Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.4G may be your ideal choice over the f/1.8 discussed above.

Even at f/1.4, this lens is capable of producing images that are extremely sharp in the center. That sharpness is still very good towards the corners of the image as well. There are no real problems with chromatic aberration or flare, and the nine-bladed diaphragm ensures that the bokeh is smooth.

While the autofocus isn’t as fast as it could be, once it gets there it’s extremely accurate. This makes shooting at wide apertures a little easier. The lens is compatible with both FX and DX Nikons (although on DX sensors the lens has a focal equivalent of 75mm). The Silent Wave AF works even on the cheapest Nikon models like the D40, D40x, and D60.

Build quality is good, with a metal lens mount and a gasket at the mount to keep dust and moisture at bay. It’s well-made but isn’t a large or heavy lens, which is a bonus if you’re carrying it around all day.

This lens really excels in low-light situations, and that’s what you need if you are a natural light shooter, especially if you prefer to hand-hold the camera.

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It’s more expensive than our top pick but is still reasonably priced. The 50mm f/1.4G is an outstanding portrait lens if you can live with the slow focusing speed. It will easily earn its keep as part of a wedding or event photographer’s kit bag. Food photographers and street photographers will also find this lens is a great choice.

3. Nikon Z 50mm f/1.8 S

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Nikon Z 50mm f/1.8 S

A good pick for Nikon’s Z-series mirrorless cameras

This lens is a good choice for those photographers looking for sharpness and excellent image quality, but who also want good value for money

$626. 95 from Amazon

Pros

Weather-sealed

Excellent image quality

Fast and reliable autofocus

Good bokeh

Cons

Manual focusing can be fiddly

The Nikon Z 50mm f/1.8 S is the most inexpensive Z-series lens so far, although it isn’t as cheap as some other 50mm primes. However, what sets it apart from the competition is its performance.

The Nikkor Z 50mm is sturdily built, and weather-sealed against dust and moisture. This makes it a good choice for outdoor portraits, weddings, or street photography. While the lens doesn’t have built-in vibration reduction, it works well with the Nikon Z-series IBIS to stabilize the lens. This allows you to get sharp images at much slower shutter speeds.

This lens is super-sharp, even at the widest aperture, and f/1.8 combined with the IBIS makes this a superb lens for shooting in low-light situations. The autofocus is fast and accurate, too, which makes this lens invaluable for use at weddings and events where you need to lock on focus quickly.

Manual focusing is less than ideal, though. The focus-by-wire motor means that manual focus becomes an electronic process, and small, precise adjustments can become difficult.

Fast movements of the focus ring, even without a lot of rotation, means that focus jumps from one end of the scale to the other. Nikon’s Z lenses also don’t save the focus position when the camera is turned off and the focus reverts back to infinity when it’s turned on again.

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There is very little barrel distortion with the Nikkor Z 50mm, and the special lens coatings control ghosting and flare very well. The nine-bladed diaphragm ensures a nice bokeh, although real bokeh aficionados may prefer the Sigma Art 50mm f/1.4 discussed below.

4. Sigma 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art Lens

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Sigma 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art Lens

A great option for Nikon DSLRs

This lens is known for excellent sharpness and image quality. While it’s not cheap, it offers good value for money

$844. 95 from Amazon

Pros

Excellent image quality and sharpness

All metal barrel

Far cheaper than the Zeiss Milvus 50mm

Good value for money

Cons

Very heavy

Lens mount not weather-sealed

Sigma makes one of the best third-party lenses in the world. Its Art series lenses are renowned for their image quality, sharpness, and minimal distortion.

The Sigma 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art lens is rated as the sharpest by DxOMark among all 50mm lenses made for the Nikon F mount. It opens up to a wide f/1.4 maximum aperture and down to f/16.

The all-metal barrel and metal lens mount mean it can take a beating but this design also adds on the weight, meaning this is not a light lens. It weighs in at 28.7 oz/815 g, which can throw off the balance of a smaller camera body. The lack of weather-sealing at the lens mount is disappointing, especially given the price point of this lens. However, it’s not a deal-breaker unless you spend a lot of time shooting in adverse weather conditions.

It has one molded glass aspherical element and three special low dispersion elements. The lens also has a super multi-layer coating, and the design of the lens represents a floating architecture.

This is an auto-focusing lens. Sigma used their ring-type Hyper Sonic Motor-powered auto-focusing system for this lens. You get full manual focusing override. The front element of the lens does not protrude when focusing.

Related Posts

Review of the Best Sigma Lenses Best Lenses for the Nikon D5600

The shooting performance offered by this lens is second to none. You get stunning, creamy bokeh, and optimal sharpness. It’s no doubt this is a firm favorite if you can get past the bulky weight of the lens.

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The Sigma Art 50mm f/1.4 offers great value for money and will be a good investment for years to come.

5. Zeiss Milvus 50mm f/1.

4 Image from Amazon

Zeiss Milvus 50mm f/1.4

Best for professionals

The Zeiss Milvus 50mm is probably one of the best 50mm lenses you can get, and ticks all the right boxes for serious photographers

$1,045.24 from Amazon

Pros

Outstanding image quality

Great in low light

Well-built

Precise manual focusing

Cons

Expensive

No AF

The Zeiss Milvus 50mm f/1.4 is a manual focusing lens designed for the Nikon F mount camera systems. It is a product of the new Distagon optical lens design that Zeiss adopted. This replaces the older Standard Planar design discontinued in 2015.

This lens offers fantastic optical quality and the robust design that Zeiss lenses are renowned for. The widest aperture of the lens is f/1.4, which makes it a great choice for low-light shooting, and it can stop all the way down to f/16.

The Zeiss Milvus 50mm f/1. 4 has a floating lens construction which ensures that the lens has excellent performance no matter where you’re focusing.

There are four anomalous partial dispersion elements, plus one aspherical element. These ensure suppression of chromatic aberrations and better sharpness and contrast even when shooting wide open.

The lens also has a Zeiss T* Anti-Reflective Coating. This ensures better contrast and color reproduction when shooting in bright conditions.

Image from Amazon

The Zeiss Milvus 50mm is probably the Rolls-Royce of 50mm lenses, and unfortunately, it comes with a price tag to match! Given the price, and that there’s no AF, its likely appeal is for professional photographers instead of those just starting out. However, if you can afford the Zeiss Milvus 50mm, then it will give you a lifetime of outstanding image quality and sharpness.

The Best 50mm Lenses for Nikon Cameras: Conclusion

There we have it – the five best 50mm lenses for Nikon cameras currently out there. Our top pick is the mighty little Nikon 50mm f/1.8G AF-S for all-around great performance and price.

The lens you ultimately choose will come down to the type of photography you do, the price, and personal preference. Hopefully, you have found a ‘nifty fifty’ lens to suit you in our list!


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Best 50mm lens of 2021

Without one of the best 50mm lenses in your camera bag, you can't say your kit is complete. With a focal length pretty much equivalent to what the human eye can see, they capture a naturalistic mid-range perspective that's great for all kinds of photography. No wonder it has become a classic focal length.

While you can happily spend four figures on some of the best 50mm lenses, some can be had for as little as a couple of hundred pounds or dollars. Of course, there are differences: more expensive optics often have higher maximum apertures from f/1.2 to f/1.4, as well as incredibly sharp image quality and beautiful bokeh. They may also be of a more robust construction than their f/1.8 counterparts, but don't discount the more affordable alternative as some of the best 50mm lenses are in the cheaper price bracket. This is because they offer a great combination of value, portability and versatility.

With that choice, we've put together this guide to help you choose the perfect 50mm lens for you. We have included a range of specific lenses for each mount, as well as a range of third party lenses available for multiple systems. Use the navigation bar on the side of the page to navigate to the appropriate section for your camera.

One thing to be aware of is that a 50mm lens will not always provide the field of view of a 50mm lens, depending on the sensor size of the camera you are using. On an APS-C body like the Fujifilm X camera, the same lens will have an effective focal length of 75mm (80mm for Canon), making it more suitable for portrait photography.

Downsized to a Micro Four Thirds camera, the 50mm lens will have an effective focal length of 100mm, which is more suitable for really compressed portraits and short telephotos.

With that in mind, the MFT lens we've included here is slightly under 50mm: its 42.5mm focal length equates to 85mm full frame. It is considered by many to be ideal for portraiture.

Whichever camp you're in, "fifty" may very well be the only fixed lens you'll ever buy, so it's worth buying a good one. Even so, no one likes to overspend. So let's take a look at the best 50mm lenses available right now...

Canon EF and RF

1. Canon RF 50mm f/1.2L USM

It may be expensive, but Canon's 50mm RF system lens is a terrific performer.

Mount options: Canon RF | Effective focal length: 50 mm | Full frame compatible: Yes | Autofocus type: Ultrasonic (ring) | Stabilizer: No | Minimum focus distance: 0. 40 m | Filter thread: 77 mm | Dimensions (WxD): 89.8 x 108 mm | Weight: 950g

  • + Incredible sharpness
  • + Fast autofocus
  • - Incredible price tag
  • - Large for the system
  • Of course, it is too large for the cameras for which it is designed. Of course, it costs about the same as a new EOS R camera. These are all valid highlights. But… well, if you use the RF 50mm f/1.2L USM lens, you'll get the idea. This is simply a beautiful lens that drastically changes what the L-series is capable of. Actual results are nearly flawless, with exceptional sharpness even wide open at f/1.2, and a customizable control ring lets you really customize and control the lens that way. the way you want it. There's also weather protection and a super-fast autofocus system: in short, everything you could want from a lens of this type. This is an incredible feat of engineering from Canon.

    2. Canon RF 50mm f/1.

    8 STM

    Bargain and essential lens for EOS R series owners.

    Mount options: Canon RF | Effective focal length: 50 mm | Full frame compatible: Yes | Auto focus type: Stepper motor | Stabilizer: No | Minimum focusing distance: 0.30 m | Filter thread: 43 mm | Dimensions (WxD): 69.2 x 40.5 mm | Weight: 160g

  • + Impressive image quality
  • + Very affordable
  • + Fast focus
  • - Not weatherproof
  • Although the RF 50mm f/1.2L USM is a stunning lens, its price out of reach for many EOS R series users. This is where the new RF 50mm f/1.8 STM comes in – a cheap, compact and capable standard prime lens. The good news is also that image quality hasn't been compromised - our tests show it's on par with the much more expensive f/1.2 option in some areas, while build quality is noticeably better than the EF equivalent (although It's worth keeping in mind that this is not pressurized weather). Focusing is also very good, as the stepping motor (STM) used ensures fast and quiet focusing that is fast enough for stills and smooth enough for video. The Canon RF 50mm f/1.8 STM is a fantastic everyday lens that pairs well with any RF body.

    3. Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 STM

    An unconventional choice for the Canon 50mm, but a smart buy

    Mount Options: Canon EF | Effective focal length: 50 mm | Full frame compatible: Yes | Auto focus type: Stepper motor | Stabilizer: No | Minimum focusing distance: 0.35 m | Filter thread: 49 mm | Dimensions (WxD): 69x 39 mm | Weight: 160g

  • + Favorable price and light weight
  • + Fast and quiet autofocus
  • - Mediocre edge sharpness at large apertures
  • - Maximum aperture only f/1.8
  • Canon released 505 lens 1.8 years ago may seem like an obvious choice, but we prefer this new option. It is two thirds of the aperture slower, but at less than a third of the price, much lighter and has better performance.

    Unlike previous f/1.8 versions, the "STM" model has a stepper motor autofocus system that provides fast yet quiet operation. The focus ring no longer rotates during autofocus, which improves control and also allows manual override in single autofocus mode.

    The lens has a metal mounting plate instead of a plastic one, and a more rounded aperture based on seven aperture blades instead of five.

    After testing several samples of Canon's 50mm f/1.4 and f/1.8 lenses, we found the f/1.8 AF system to be much more accurate and reliable than its big brother. Sharpness is also better than Canon's 50mm f/1.4 lens from center to edges.

    Color fringing is minimal at wide apertures and negligible at other apertures. There is a bit more distortion than some competing lenses, but it's rarely noticeable. Considering the affordable price, this lens is an inexpensive buy for the budget.

    Nikon F&Z

    4. Nikon Z 50mm f/1.8 S

    It may be a "standard" prime, but its performance is not at all

    Mount options: Nikon Z | Effective focal length: 50 mm | Full frame compatible: Yes | Auto focus type: Stepper motor | Stabilizer: No | Minimum focusing distance: 0.4 m | Filter thread: 62 mm | Dimensions (WxD): 76 x 86.5 mm | Weight: 415g

  • + Incredibly sharp
  • + Achieves beautiful bokeh
  • - Premium price
  • - Heavier than its F-mount counterpart a stack that includes two ED glass elements as well as two aspherical elements to enhance contrast and brightness.

    Externally, the Z 50mm is noticeably larger and heavier than the good old Nikkor AF-S 50mm f/1.8G F-mount, but compared to some Sigma and Tokina 50mm F-mount alternatives, it is pleasantly portable.

    The lens barrel only has a single AF/MF switch, but the wide, tactile, and precise manual focus ring isn't superfluous if you're using autofocus, as it can also be set in-camera to adjust exposure compensation or ISO sensitivity.

    Nikon made a lot of noise about the larger internal diameter of the Z mount (55mm) and the reduced distance between the lens flange and the image sensor compared to Nikon's F mount. All this should improve the quality of the image. 9The 0005

    It's not just hype, as the Z 50mm is terrifyingly sharp, only marginally behind the much more expensive Z 35mm f/1.8 S, and it's the sharpest lens we've ever tested.

    Aberrations are virtually non-existent at any aperture, as is distortion, and the stepper motor AF never missed a beat in our tests.

    5. Nikon AF-S 50mm f/1.4G

    A compact and lightweight f/1.4 lens that delivers incredible sharpness across the entire image frame.

    Mount options: Nikon F | Effective focal length: 50 mm | Full frame compatible: Yes | Autofocus type: Ultrasonic (ring) | Stabilizer: No | Minimum focusing distance: 0. 45 m | Filter thread: 58mm | Dimensions (WxD): 74 x 54 mm | Weight: 280g

  • + Clear sharpness from f/2.8
  • + Good autofocus
  • - Noticeable distortion
  • - Susceptible to flash
  • Compared to Nikon's Sigma 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM lens | A or Zeiss Milvus 50mm f/1.4, Nikon's own brand lens is only half the physical length and about a third of the weight. It is simpler than the Sigma, with eight rather than 13 optical elements, and much less rugged than the metal-clad Zeiss.

    Another sign of downsizing is that the Nikkor only has a 58mm filter thread, which is quite small for a 50mm f/1.4 lens. The direct optical path contains no aspherical elements (as found in Nikon's more budget 50mm f/1.8 models) and also no ED (Extra-Low Dispersion) elements or nanocrystalline coating.

    AF accuracy is more important with very wide aperture lenses, and the Nikkor excels in this regard, unlike the Canon f/1. 4. Sharpness is average at f/1.4 but drops to f/2.8 and this lens delivers superb sharpness across the entire image frame.

    Lateral chromatic aberration is minimal, although longitudinal fringing is present when aperture is wide open. The nine-blade diaphragm helps maintain smooth bokeh with light braking. The only weak link is distortion, which is worse than we would like for a standard prime. Overall, this lens is well worth the extra cost compared to Nikon's f/1.8 optics.

    Sony E

    6. Sony FE 50mm F1.2 G Master

    Sony's Accelerated Standard Standard Prime fits the bill

    Install: Sony FE | Items / groups: 14/10 | Diaphragm Vanes: 11 | Autofocus: XD Linear Motors | Stabilizer: No | Minimum focusing distance: 0.4 m | Maximum magnification: 0.17x | Filter thread: 72 mm | Dimensions (WxD): 87x108 mm | Weight: 788g

  • + Excellent handling characteristics
  • + Superb sharpness even at f/1. 2
  • + Robust weatherproof construction
  • - Expensive if you don't need an f/1.2 aperture.
  • - A little bulky
  • - Strong vignetting at f/1.2
  • Sony's lineup of 50mm lenses is very extensive right now, but we think its latest 50mm f/1.2 G Master optic is the best of the lot. While it feels rather bulky on Sony's mirrorless body, it's still quite compact and light enough for an f/1.2 lens. The all-weather design looks completely professional, there are two customizable function buttons that naturally fall under the thumb when shooting in both landscape and portrait orientations, and the manual iris ring features a switch for smooth operation during shooting. video capture. Unlike most ultra-fast lenses, Sony retains impressive sharpness across the entire image frame, even wide open. The bokeh is beautifully smooth and there is very little lateral and axial color fringing. There is noticeable vignetting when shooting at f/1.2, but it all but disappears at f/2, and in-camera auto correction is still available.

    7. Sony FE 50mm f/2.5 G

    A good 50mm Sony lens doesn't have to be big

    Install: Sony FE | Elements / groups: 9/9 | Diaphragm Vanes: 7 | Auto focus: Linear motors | Stabilizer: No | Minimum focusing distance: 0.31 m | Maximum magnification: 0.21x | Filter thread: 49 mm | Dimensions (WxD): 68x45 mm | Mass: 174 g

  • + excellent image quality
  • + very small, very light
  • + fast and silent autofocus
  • + disconnected diaphragm ring
  • - not fast at 50mm
  • - no focal scale of
  • V. Unlike many high-profile 50mm lenses with very fast maximum apertures, the FE 50mm f/2.5 is extremely small, extremely light and extremely practical. It can be moved to places where you simply would not take a larger lens: with a lens of this size, you can shoot all day without pain in your hand. Its f/2.5 maximum aperture may seem very modest by today's standards, but it's still faster than even a professional zoom lens, albeit at a smaller size and cost. Performance-wise, this lens is simply amazing. Sharpness is impressive, especially between f/2.8 and f/5.6, and chromatic aberration is almost imperceptible. Dual linear AF motors do their job silently, smoothly and quickly, and although there is no stabilization, all modern Sony A7 (and A9) cameras) in any case have built-in stabilization.

    8. Samyang AF 50mm f/1.4 FE

    Ultra-clear autofocus for Sony A7 and A9 cameras

    Mount options: Sony E | Effective focal length: 50 mm | Full frame compatible: Yes | Autofocus type: Ultrasonic (ring) | Stabilizer: No | Minimum focusing distance: 0.45 m | Filter thread: 67 mm | Dimensions (WxD): 74 x 98 mm | Mass: 585g

  • + Excellent sharpness from f/2
  • + Premium metal build
  • - Vignetting at large apertures
  • - Quite heavy production of autofocus lenses, mainly for full-frame Sony E-mount lenses.

    There are currently five E-mount lenses to choose from, as well as two Canon EF and one Nikon F lenses. This 50mm lens gives a "standard" perspective for Sony A7 and A9 cameraswith f/1.4 aperture.

    Physically, it is about twice as long as Canon and Nikkor 50mm f/1.4 lenses for full-frame SLRs. The solid construction consists mainly of the metal parts of the barrel, contributing to its hefty weight of 585g.

    Samyang's performance does not disappoint. Sharpness is very even across the frame at f/1.4 and becomes excellent at f/2, where contrast is also excellent. Vignetting will be pretty strong until you hit f/2.8, but fringing is especially subtle and there's very little barrel distortion.

    Pentax 50mm Lenses

    9. HD Pentax D FA* 50mm f1.4 SDM AW

    Aperture Lens Designed for K-1 and K-1 Mark II Users

    Mount Options: K | Effective focal length: 50 mm | Full frame compatible: Yes | Autofocus type: Ultrasonic (ring) | Stabilizer: No | Minimum focusing distance: 0. 4 m | Filter thread: 72 mm | Dimensions (WxD): 106 x 80 mm | Weight: 910g

  • + Excellent sharpness at f/1.4
  • + Smooth autofocus
  • + Good bokeh
  • - Large and heavy
  • HD Pentax D FA* 50mm f1.4 SDM AW represents the first optic Pentax in a new generation of Star Series optics that was designed for use with the K-1 and K-1 Mark II full-frame SLRs. Designed to the highest in-house standards for both current and future Pentax SLR cameras, this 50mm lens features Aero Bright Coating II, a nanotechnology lens coating that uses an ultra-low refraction film manufacturing process, while the lens also includes three ultra low dispersion glass elements and one aspherical element. Large and heavy lens weighing almost 1kg, it is dustproof and weather resistant, and equipped with a newly developed annular SDM (direct drive supersonic motor). It's pricey, but if you're looking for a high-quality standard lens for your full-frame Pentax DSLR, this is the best 50mm lens you can buy.

    Fujifilm X 50mm lenses

    10. Fujinon XF50mm f/2 R WR.

    Relatively expensive solution for Fujifilm X cameras, but amazing performance.

    Mounting options: Fuji X | Effective focal length: 75 mm | Full frame compatible: No | Auto focus type: Stepper motor | Stabilizer: No | Minimum focusing distance: 0.39 m | Filter thread: 46 mm | Dimensions (WxD): 60 x 59 mm | Weight: 200g

  • + Excellent sharpness
  • + Superb autofocus
  • - Pretty expensive for an f/2 lens
  • - Hint of pincushion distortion for an f/2 lens. Indeed, it has the lowest aperture of any lens in this test group.

    Still, it's of impeccable design, with integrated weather seals, a physical aperture ring for improved aperture priority and manual shooting, and a high-quality optical path that includes an aspherical ED (Extra-Low Dispersion) element. Nine-blade round diaphragm.

    Autofocus is almost silent. As with other "stepper motor" systems, the focus ring is electronically linked and, in this case, allows for particularly precise manual control.

    On Fujifilm X cameras, the lens has an effective focal length of 75mm and offers a shallow depth of field at f/2, making it an excellent portrait lens. Wide-open aperture has excellent edge-to-edge sharpness, very good resistance to ghosting and flare, and fringing is virtually undetectable at wide aperture. There is a very slight hint of pincushion distortion, but it usually goes unnoticed.

    Micro Four Thirds 50mm Lenses

    11. Panasonic Lumix G 42.5mm f/1.7 Asph P.OIS

    Stabilized Portrait Prime for Micro Four Thirds Cameras

    0 Mount Options04 | Effective focal length: 85 mm | Full frame compatible: No | Auto focus type: Stepper motor | Stabilizer: Yes | Minimum focusing distance: 0. 31 m | Filter thread: 37 mm | Dimensions (WxD): 55 x 50 mm | Weight: 130g

  • + Compact and lightweight
  • + OIS
  • - Short focal length 85mm equivalent
  • - Medium sharpness
  • , are generally compact and very light - just 130g - that's part of the weight of some premium DSLR prices.

    With an effective focal length of 85mm, the Panasonic is ideal for portraiture, and the f/1.7 aperture provides a fairly shallow depth of field. It is well designed and comes with an optical image stabilizer.

    This makes it ideal for Panasonic cameras; for Olympus bodies with sensor-shift stabilization, we chose the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 45mm f/1.8.

    Autofocus is fast and accurate, and color fringing is hardly a problem as even Raw files are corrected automatically. There is the slightest barrel distortion, but you hardly notice it. Sharpness is good, but not great, and many other competing optics provide better sharpness in the center of the frame.

    With its relatively "telephoto" effective focal length, this lens' OIS is a great choice for MFT shooters whose cameras don't have built-in IS.

    50mm Multi-mount Lenses

    12. Tokina Opera 50mm f/1.4 FF

    Prime of the highest caliber 50mm.

    Mount options: Canon EF, Nikon F | Effective focal length: 50 mm | Full frame compatible: Yes | Autofocus type: Ultrasonic (ring) | Stabilizer: No | Minimum focusing distance: 0.4 m | Filter thread: 72 mm | Dimensions (WxD): 80 x 107.5 mm | Weight: 950g

  • + Unsurpassed sharpness
  • + No distortion and negligible fringing
  • - Very expensive
  • - Large and heavy
  • Designed as the start of Opera's high-end lens line, this lens sits above the AT-X line of lenses and competes with Sigma and Tamron's latest premium offerings.

    Inside is a 9-element optical stack that contains three SD (Extra-Low Dispersion) elements and one aspherical element to minimize chromatic aberrations, while a new ELR (Extremely Low Reflection) coating reduces ghosting, flare and reflections. The

    Opera 50mm is dust and splash resistant, and although its autofocus system is an ultrasonic ring system rather than a more modern stepper motor design, it is fast and reliable.

    But what's most impressive is Opera's picture quality. Sharpness is excellent, even wide open at f/1.4, becoming simply superb from f/2 to f/11. Purple fringing is very well controlled right at the corners of the frame, and you can forget about distortion as there is simply none. The

    Opera 50mm will cost you significantly more than the already expensive Sigma 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM | A, but this is a new sharpness test for standard Canon or Nikon DSLRs.

    13. Sigma 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM | A

    Top drawer design, superior handling and versatility

    Mount options: Canon EF, Nikon F, Sony A, Sigma | Effective focal length: 50 mm | Full frame compatible: Yes | Autofocus type: Ultrasonic (ring) | Stabilizer: No | Minimum focusing distance: 0. 4 m | Filter thread: 77 mm | Dimensions (WxD): 85 x 100 mm | Weight: 815g

  • + Superb all-around image quality
  • + Superb build quality
  • - Not as sharp as the very best
  • - Large and heavy for a 50mm prime
  • was known as the previous Sigma 50mm lens a heavyweight, but his "art" edition is really gaining weight. Its physical length has increased by 50% and its weight has increased from 505g to 815g.

    The main reason for the increase in weight of the Art lens is that it has a much more complex and sophisticated optical path than its predecessor, based on 13 elements rather than eight. These include one complex aspherical element and three SLD (Special Low Dispersion) elements.

    Build quality is excellent, although there are no weather seals and the focus ring does not have the tactile smoothness of a Zeiss Milvus lens. But you can count on the Sigma's autofocus system to be fast and accurate.

    Sigma is stunningly sharp even at f/1.4 along with soft creamy bokeh. Sharpness only drops at f/1.4 at the extreme corners of the image frame. Color fringing is minimal at any aperture, even in the corners of the frame, and barrel distortion is negligible.

    14. Zeiss Milvus 50mm f/1.4 ZF.2

    Who needs autofocus when image quality is so good?

    Mount options: Canon EF, Nikon F | Effective focal length: 50 mm | Full frame compatible: Yes | AF type: Manual only | Stabilizer: No | Minimum focusing distance: 0.34 m | Filter thread: 67 mm | Dimensions (WxD): 83 x 98 mm | Weight: 922 g

  • + Stunning sharpness and bokeh
  • + Uncompromising build quality
  • - Manual focus only
  • - Very expensive
  • Autofocus cameras have been around since 1977 years old, so it might seem odd that Zeiss is still stubbornly making manual focus lenses. However, the Milvus line of fixed focal length lenses certainly provide a practical comfort factor. The

    50mm f/1.4 is typical in that it has a beautifully designed metal barrel and a full set of weather seals. The optical design is based on the legendary Zeiss Distagon principles. The long stroke of the focus ring contributes to precise focusing, and its super-smooth smoothness makes focusing a joy. 9The 0005

    Nikon edition features a physical aperture ring with a click-off option to ensure smooth aperture transitions during movie shooting. This ring is missing from the Canon version.

    Due to its reputation and price, Milvus delivers excellent image quality. Wide open, it combines excellent contrast and stellar sharpness almost across the frame.

    There is beautiful bokeh, and the lens retains excellent smoothness in out-of-focus areas with little deceleration. Color fringing is practically no problem with this lens, even in the corners.

    Slightly more distortion than the Tamron SP 45mm f/1. 8 Di VC USD, but less than competing 50mm lenses from Canon and Nikon.

    • The best wide-angle lenses for Canon.
    • The best wide-angle lenses for Nikon.
    • Top 70-200mm telephoto lenses.

    Canon's Best 50mm Lens [Review 2022]

    As an Amazon partner, we earn on qualifying purchases.

    The 50mm lens is the versatile tool you need when shooting real estate. By purchasing the best 50mm lens for Canon, you will increase its performance and be able to take outstanding images. However, not all Canon 50mm lenses are the same and below are our top picks.

    Quick Navigation

    • Our best 50mm lens for Canon. Reviews
      • Canon EF 50 mm F / 1.2
      • SIGMA 50 mm F / 1.4
      • Yongnuo yn 50mm f / 1.8
      • Canon EF 50 mm F / 1.8
      • Canon EF F / 1.4
      • Zeiss Milvus 50mm F / 1.4
      • Yongnuo YN 50mm f/1.4
    • Conclusion

    Our best 50mm lens for Canon.

    Reviews

    The 50mm lens blurs the background for more creative shooting options. This review of the best 50mm lens for Canon will help you make an informed decision.

    Brand

    Canon EF 50 mm F / 1.2

    SIGMA 50 mm F / 1.4

    Yongnuo yn 50mm f / 1.8

    Lens

    Standard

    Simple number 9000,000

    Maximum focal focal length

    millimeters 50

    millimeters 50

    millimeters 50

    Price

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    Brand

    Canon EF 50 mm F / 1.2

    Product

    Type of lens

    Standard

    Maximum focal distance

    millimeters 50

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    Brand

    SIGMA 50 mm F / 1.4

    Type of lens

    9000 9000

    Maximum

    Maximum focal length

    Millimeters 50

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    Brand

    Yongnuo YN 50mm f/1.8

    Product

    Lens Type

    Prime

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    Millimeters 50

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    Here is a quick overview of our recommended Canon 50mm lens listed in this article. In this table, we have also included an overview of their main features.

    Product Optics aperture Weight (lb)
    Canon EF50mm

    It has a Super Spectra coating that helps reduce flare and ghosting in case of poor lighting. In addition to a wide f/1.2 aperture, it features eight rounded aperture blades and eight elements arranged in 6 groups to improve image quality.

    However, the wide aperture makes precise focusing difficult. This is because movement when you press the shutter release can blur the image. Although the Canon EF 50mm f/1.2 is not as heavy as the Sigma 50mm f/1.4, it still weighs in at a significant 1.28 lbs, which may not be practical to carry or shoot for long periods of time.

    Pros
    • It has the widest aperture on our list, producing quality bokeh.
    • It comes with a weather seal to protect the elements
    • It has a Super Spectra coating to help reduce flare and ghosting.
    Cons
    • While not as heavy as the Sigma 50mm f/1.4, it weighs 1.28 pounds and is harder to carry around.
    • A wide aperture makes it difficult to focus on the subject.

    Canon EF 50mm f/1.2L USM Ultra-Fast Standard...

    • Lens hood and case included
    • Latest Ultrasonic Motor (USM) for fast and near-silent auto focusing
    • Full-time manual override / Minimum focus distance 45 cm

    Sigma 50 mm f / 1.4

    The Sigma 50 mm f / 1.4 slot machine is incredibly economical thanks to its high-quality, heat-resistant composite construction. As a rule, it maintains the same dimensions regardless of operating temperatures.

    Unlike the Canon EF 50mm f/1.8, the Sigma 50mm f/1.4 consists of 13 elements grouped into 8 groups, including three unique low dispersion elements to reduce chromatic aberration and improve image quality.

    It has a ring-type autofocus function with continuous manual focus override for better focus control. At 1.8 pounds, it's 0.4 pounds lighter than the Zeiss Milvus 50mm f/1.4, making it a little more manageable when shooting.

    Unlike the Canon EF 50mm f/1.8, the Sigma 50mm f/1.4 has nine rounded aperture blades that form a nice round aperture. In addition to a maximum aperture of f/1.4, the Sigma 50mm f/1.4 delivers beautiful bokeh and excellent low-light performance.

    Pros
    • Stable thermal design makes it easy to maintain dimensions regardless of temperature.
    • Contains 13 elements, most of the items on our list to minimize distortion.
    • It comes with low dispersion elements to eliminate chromatic aberration.
    Cons
    • Even though it is lighter than Zeiss Milvus, it is still hard to carry around.
    • The bokeh quality is not as good as the Canon EF 50mm f/1. 2.

    Sigma 50mm F1.4 Art DG HSM lens for Canon

    • 50mm focal length
    • 75mm equivalent focal length for APS-C cameras, 80mm equivalent focal length for Canon APS-C cameras
    • maximum aperture F1.4; Minimum F16

    Yongnuo YN 50mm f/1.8

    If you're looking for an alternative, the Yongnuo YN 50mm f/1.8 might be the best choice on our list. Image quality is good, with autofocus and constant manual override functions.

    With a maximum aperture of f/1.8, it's impressively fast, and you can create beautiful background blur with a reasonable amount of light. Unlike the Sigma 50mm f/1.4, the Yongnuo YN 50mm f/1.8 has a simple design consisting of six elements grouped into 5 groups.

    In addition, the multi-coated glass element helps resist flare and ghosting, especially when shooting scenes with the sun on the horizon. The aperture diaphragm has 7 blades, which makes the bokeh quality less impressive than the Canon EF 50mm f/1. 2.

    Pros
    • It comes with both autofocus and manual focus, unlike the Zeiss Milvus 50mm f/1.4.
    • It has a maximum aperture of f/1.8 and is impressively fast.
    • It comes with multi-coated glass elements to prevent glare and ghosting.
    Cons
    • The bokeh quality is less impressive than the Canon EF 50mm f/1.2.
    • It has fewer elements to reduce distortion than the Sigma 50mm f/1.4.

    YONGNUO YN50mm F1.8 Large Aperture Autofocus Lens...

    • F1.8 huge aperture, virtual background that makes photography more interesting.
    • Supports autofocus and manual focus, full frame cameras and APS-C cameras, 5 groups of 6 slices...
    • Supports M/AV/TV/P and other camera shooting modes, and can display aperture data in...

    Canon EF 50mm f/1.8

    Although it weighs the least on our list, this item was not found. has excellent image quality. It is one of the first lenses to use an STM AF motor specifically designed to work with Canon's Dual Pixel AF.

    The product was not found.

    Unlike the Sigma 50mm f/1.4, it features six elements in 5 groups to help reduce chromatic aberration and color fringing. Although it is primarily made of plastic, the build quality includes weather protection that is conducive to harsh weather conditions.

    Perfect for night shooting with f/1.8 maximum aperture and 50mm focal length. It weighs less than a pound and is easy to carry around.

    Although the lens aperture has seven rounded blades, they are less impressive than the 9 blades of the Canon EF 50mm f/1.2. . In addition, it does not have image stabilization, which affects the image quality.

    Pros
    • Unlike the Zeiss Milvus 50mm f/1.4, it uses both autofocus and manual focus for better focus.
    • It includes a weather seal to protect 9 elements0047
    • Weighs less than a pound, easy to carry
    Cons
    • Unlike the Sigma 50mm f/1.4, the Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 has only six elements, which affects the resulting images.
    • Plastic construction is not durable.

    Product not found.

    Canon EF 50mm f/1.4

    The Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 slot machine is compact and very handy, allowing you to enjoy the benefits of a wide aperture. It features Gaussian optics, Super Spectra coatings and high refraction elements for distortion-free and bokeh-free images.

    With a maximum wide aperture of f/1.4, it's great for shooting indoor real estate and places where you need more exposure. It also features manual micro ultrasonic autofocus for improved focusing.

    Unlike the Sigma 50mm f/1.4, the Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 has a simple design of 7 elements in 6 groups. with two high refractive index elements. Similar to the Canon EF 50mm f/1.2, Super Spectra coating reduces ghosting and flare and improves image color reproduction.

    Pros
    • The f/1.4 maximum wide aperture is great for indoor shooting.
    • It comes with a Super Spectra coating to reduce ghosting and flare.
    • It has both autofocus and manual focus, unlike the Zeiss Milvus 50mm f/1.4.
    Cons
    • The bokeh it produces is less impressive than the Canon EF 50mm f/1.2.
    • Unlike the Sigma 50mm f/1.4, the Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 has fewer elements to reduce distortion.

    Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM Standard & Medium Fixed...

    • Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM Standard & Medium Telephoto Lens for Canon SLR Cameras - Fixed
    • B+W 58mm Clear UV Haze with Multi-resistant Coating (010M)

    Zeiss Milvus 50mm f/1.

    4

    The Zeiss Milvus 50mm f/1.4 slot machine features outstanding design such as weatherproofing and perfect protection of all lens elements. Unlike the Canon EF 50mm f/1.4, the Zeiss Milvus 50mm f/1.4 features ten elements grouped into 8 groups to reduce distortion and improve image quality.

    The floating design of the Zeiss Milvus 1.4mm f/50 lens with a maximum aperture of f/1.4 delivers clear, bright and accurate images. This all-metal lens is ideal for outdoor real estate photography as it is resistant to harsh weather and dust.

    However, at 2.22 pounds it is the heaviest lens on our list. which makes it unsuitable for long term use as it could hurt your wrists. Unlike the Yongnuo YN 50mm f/1.4, the Zeiss Milvus 50mm f/1.4 only has manual focus, the being its biggest drawback.

    Pros
    • It comes with a weather seal to protect the elements.
    • Unlike the Canon EF 50mm f/1. 8, it comes with a solid metal body.
    • Floating lens design for sharp images.
    Cons
    • It's the heaviest on our list, so you can't carry it around.
    • Unlike the others on our list, it only comes with manual focus.

    Zeiss Milvus 1.4/50 ZE, Camera mount: Canon...

    • Creative photography and video shooting thanks to precise manual focusing: zeiss milvus lenses feature...
    • The future-proof solution for high resolution camera systems: excellent image quality...
    • excellent image even in difficult lighting conditions: all lenses are equipped with zeiss anti-reflective coating...

    Yongnuo YN 50mm f/1.4

    Yongnuo YN slot machine The 50mm f/1.4 features quality composite construction and four ultra-high refractive index elements to eliminate distortion and aberrations. It comes with a multi-layer coating to reduce ghosting and flare, increasing versatility, especially when shooting low-light scenes.

    Although the aperture diaphragm has 7 blades, the 's bokeh quality is less impressive than that of the Canon EF 50mm f/1.2. Compared to the Yongnuo YN 50mm f/1.8, the Yongnuo YN 50mm f/1.4 features nine elements grouped in 7 groups and a wide aperture of f/1.4 for a third of the extra illumination.

    The extra lighting is its biggest advantage over the Yongnuo YN 50mm f/1.8. It weighs 1.69 lbs, which is less convenient as it can be too tiring to carry around or hurt your wrists if you use it for a long time.

    Pros
    • It has more elements to reduce distortion than the Yongnuo YN 50mm f/1.8.
    • It provides more light than the Yongnuo YN 50mm f/1.8.
    • It comes with both auto focus and manual focus for better focus.
    Cons
    • Harder to carry around
    • Bokeh quality is less impressive compared to the Canon EF 50mm f/1.

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