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Best mirrorless camera video


8 Best Mirrorless Cameras for Video in 2022 (Updated Monthly)

Not long ago, the idea of there being the best mirrorless cameras for video recording would have raised some eyebrows. Mirrorless cameras were relatively new, and professionals tended to look down their noses at them. Things have changed quickly in the world, and now many photographers see mirrorless as the way to go.

We’ve gathered together our top picks for you, for a range of budgets. For a camera that has incredible autofocus, external sound ports, and focus racking via its touchscreen, this is our winner.

Panasonic Lumix GH5S

This mirrorless camera is perfect for video, boasting features like 10-bit 4K video, dual native ISO, and a V-Log L profile.

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Panasonic Lumix GH5S

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What is the Best Mirrorless Camera for Video?

There’s something here for nearly every budget. Before we dive into details about each camera, here’s a summary of our recommendations.

Panasonic Lumix GH5S

Best Overall

  • Large, detailed viewfinder
  • Advanced video options, like vectorscopes and waveforms
  • Impressive 10-bit 4:2:2 internal video capture up to 30p
  • Excellent video options of 4K DCI and Ultra HD video up to 60p

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Panasonic Lumix GH5S

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Panasonic Lumix GX85 (GX80)

Best Entry-Level

  • Customizable face-detection autofocus
  • Intelligent 5-axis image stabilization uses lens data for super-sharp images
  • Programmed focus tracking via touchscreen
  • Customizable on-screen buttons
  • Excellent 4K video quality

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Panasonic Lumix GX85 (GX80)

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Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7

Best for External Sound

  • A fast and accurate autofocus
  • Helpful focus peaking and zebra highlight warnings
  • An external microphone input
  • 4K stills mode
  • Excellent 4K video and LCD resolution

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Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7

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Sony a6400

Best for Low Light

  • Superb image quality for APS-C
  • Good low-light Performance
  • Compact camera body
  • No time limit for recording video

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Sony a6400

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$898.00

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Fujifilm X-T4

Most Stylish-Looking

  • Decent APS-C BSI-CMOS sensor
  • A great frame rate of 15 fps
  • 6.5 stops of image stabilization
  • 4K video (DCI or Ultra HD) up to 60 fps
  • A fully articulating rear touchscreen
  • 12 Film Simulation modes

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Fujifilm X-T4

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Nikon Z6 II

Best Value Full Frame Camera

  • Excellent low-light focusing
  • Lightweight and portable
  • Superb low-light dynamic range
  • Dual memory card slots

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Nikon Z6 II

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Canon EOS R6

Best for ISO Range

  • Relatively affordable
  • Excellent in-body image stabilization
  • Compact and ergonomic design
  • Fantastic expandable ISO range
  • Rapid burst speeds

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Panasonic Lumix DC-S1H

Best for Image Stabilization

  • Great optics for low-light situations
  • Dual in-body image stabilization of up to 6.5 stops
  • Excellent-quality 6K video
  • Fantastic tools for recording video
  • Cooling vent allows longer filming time

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Panasonic Lumix DC-S1H

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So let’s take a look at the best mirrorless cameras to use for video.

Brand Panasonic

Sensor Format Micro Four Thirds

Lens Mount Micro 4/3

Megapixels 16 MP

Autofocus Points 49

Minimum ISO 100

Maximum ISO 25,600

Frame Rate 7 fps

Video

Screen Size 3"

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Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7

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Panasonic has a well-deserved reputation for producing high-quality cameras. The Lumix DMC-GX85 is no exception.

It has an impressive array of features at this price point, and the image stabilization is noteworthy. As with many Lumix cameras, the DMC-GX85 offers dual image stabilization. Used with Panasonic lenses, the 5-axis stabilization and the lens IS work in tandem.

Panasonic lenses also increase the functionality of the AF. They use performance data from the lens to inform decisions made by the Depth from Defocus (DFD) AF system. There are 49 focus points in the Contrast Detect system and customizable face detection.

This straightforward use of the touchscreen also helps focus racking. If you’re happy with 1080p video, you can even use the 4K Live Cropping feature. This lets you pan or zoom in on a shot without the camera moving or focal length changing.

Another noteworthy feature is that you can customize the on-screen buttons according to your desires. This means you can access functions while filming without taking your eyes off the screen.

SD card recording and Wi-Fi connectivity take care of recording and file transfer. And you can record video at up to 4K at 100 Mbps.

The Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX85 is one of the best mirrorless cameras for video available at this price level. It offers simplicity to match your smartphone, with a considerable step up in terms of flexibility and performance.

Some features we’d like to see would be a fully-articulating screen (this only tilts up and down) and an external microphone socket.

Brand Panasonic

Sensor Format Micro Four Thirds

Lens Mount Micro 4/3

Megapixels 16 MP

Autofocus Points 49

Minimum ISO 100

Maximum ISO 25,600

Frame Rate 7 fps

Video

Screen Size 3"

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Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7

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$497.99 $699.99

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$537. 65

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$299.00

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One big plus for the DMC-G7 is the external microphone port. In many circumstances, an external microphone can be a game-changer. Put simply, decent sound is impossible without an external microphone.

There’s not much to separate the Lumix DMC-G7 from our previous candidate in many ways. The main difference is immediately visible—the body style. Using the familiar-looking style of a DSLR, the G7 can surprise with its compact size. It is clearly much smaller than even an APS-C DSLR.

Autofocus capability is very similar. It has 49 focus points that provide Contrast Detect AF and face identification and tracking. Like the compact form factor GX85, you can use the rear screen for focus point selection, which holds true for both EVF and screen-based shooting. The AF is fast and responsive and can be used to refocus mid-shot.

It might come down to which body shape you feel comfortable with, or you might find the greater screen articulation a bonus. Either way, the Lumix DMC-G7 is a capable mirrorless camera.

Brand Sony

Sensor Format APS-C

Lens Mount Sony E

Megapixels 24.2 MP

Autofocus Points 425

Minimum ISO 100

Maximum ISO 32,000

Frame Rate 11 fps

Video

Screen Size 3"

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Sony a6400

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Perhaps the most impressive feature of the Sony Alpha a6400 is its autofocus capabilities. It relies on Contrast Detect and Phase Detect processes and has 425 focus points. It delivers superb tracking performance of faces and eyes. And it’s easy to select tracking and focus from the touchscreen.

While on the subject of the touchscreen, although it’s not fully articulating, the screen does tilt 180 degrees. This means you can see it above the camera body from the front. It’s more limited than a fully-articulating screen, but less prone to damage. And it’s better than a screen that only tilts.

Image stabilization is lens-only, which is a little surprising given what the competition is doing.

The external microphone socket is a bonus, but there is no headphone socket. Connectivity is a mixed bag—a good range of Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and smartphone control, but only a UHS-I compliant SD card slot.

The rock-solid autofocus might be the thing that sways you. After all, there’s not much point in being able to record images faster if they’re all out of focus.

Although the Sony E lens mount is proprietary, there are third-party lenses. And if you can afford it, there are high-end full frame lenses that fit. Remember, though, that with FF lenses, there will be a crop factor of 1. 5.

Brand Fujifilm

Sensor Format APS-C

Lens Mount Fujifilm X

Megapixels 26 MP

Autofocus Points 425

Minimum ISO 160

Maximum ISO 12,800

Frame Rate 20 fps

Video

Screen Size 3"

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Fujifilm X-T4

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There’s no mistaking where the design team took their cues from when they sketched out the Fujifilm X-T4.  This looks like an old manual SLR, especially in its black faux leatherette and silver guise. I happen to think this camera looks superb.

It’s not all about the looks, either. The Fujifilm X-T4 has a magnesium alloy body for strength and lightness and is a very capable performer as a mirrorless video camera. In-camera image stabilization is generally reliable, and CIPA rated to 6.5 stops.

Autofocus has face tracking with 425 focus points. It is a Contrast Detect and Phase Detect system that seems to work especially well for video recording. Tracking is not always reliable in the most demanding situations, and this is perhaps a negative in terms of video recording. However, it offers a range of frame rates providing up to 400 Mbps in 4K mode.

One final consideration is the lens mount. Fujifilm’s X-mount has a smaller range of OEM and third-party lenses available. Unlike other options, adapters for this mount will not provide fully automatic operation.

Reliability, possibly unexciting performance, and rugged good looks sum up this interesting model from Fujifilm.

Brand Panasonic

Sensor Format Micro Four Thirds

Lens Mount Micro 4/3

Megapixels 10 MP

Autofocus Points 225

Minimum ISO 160

Maximum ISO 51,200

Frame Rate 12 fps

Video

Screen Size 3. 2"

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Panasonic Lumix GH5S

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There is no doubt that the Lumix DMC-GH5S is one of the most video-oriented mirrorless cameras on the market. That’s why it’s our top choice.

This means that it dedicates itself to producing high-quality video output. It has a head-spinning range of video shooting modes that top out in 4K at 400 Mbps, and send a 10-bit signal both to its internal storage and HDMI output.

It seems almost impossible to defeat the GH5S’ sophisticated autofocus. As well as allowing you to select focus points via the touchscreen, you can use the Focus Transition function. This allows smooth, pre-determined focus racking in a shot.

External microphone and headphone sockets add to the impressive specifications list.

The Lumix DMC-GH5S is a traditional DSLR-style body with a nice chunky grip for the right hand. Large dials and clear, well-spaced buttons help its usability. Its autofocus and video capabilities put it at the top of many a would-be videographer’s list.

Brand Nikon

Sensor Format Full Frame

Lens Mount Nikon Z

Megapixels 24.5 MP

Autofocus Points 273

Minimum ISO 50

Maximum ISO 204,800

Frame Rate 14 fps

Video

Screen Size 3.2"

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Nikon Z6 II

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The Nikon Z6 II’s every inch looks like a serious camera. The body is well-constructed and will feel familiar to anyone used to a DSLR. Surprisingly, the touchscreen LCD only tilts, so it won’t suit if you want to be in front of and behind the camera at the same time.

Nikon uses a 5-axis in-body image stabilization system in the Z6II, which adds up to 5 stops. There is no coordinated in-body and lens IS.

Video autofocus is robust and uses 273 focus points, incorporating Contrast Detect and Phase Detect. Face detection and tracking (with touchscreen selection) are there as you would expect.

Also, it is no surprise that the Nikon Z6II has both microphone and headphone sockets. Its solid overall performance is ideal for video and still photography. If your needs are fairly evenly balanced between the two, this is definitely a camera to consider. You’re not limited to Z-mount lenses. Adaptors for Nikon F-mount lenses provide a vast array of original and third-party lenses.

Brand Canon

Sensor Format Full Frame

Lens Mount Canon RF

Megapixels 20. 1 MP

Autofocus Points 1,053

Minimum ISO 50

Maximum ISO 204,800

Frame Rate 20 fps

Video

Screen Size 3"

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Canon EOS R6

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It’s extraordinary that we have made it this far in the review before encountering first a Nikon and now a Canon camera. Both companies have tussled for the top spot as DSLR manufacturers for years. In the Canon EOS R6, we see a strong contender in the full frame sensor sector of the market for advanced mirrorless cameras.

Perhaps one of the Canon EOS R6’s greatest strengths is the range of lenses available. The native RF lens mount is gaining numbers all the time, including some interesting “cine” style ones. Canon produces some of its prestigious and highly regarded “L-Series” lenses for the RF. This shows how seriously they take the future of mirrorless. Additionally, Canon’s own mount adaptors allow you to use your EF and even EF-S lenses. When using an EF-S lens, the EOS R6 automatically becomes an APS-C camera.

The EOS R6 body is substantial and will feel familiar and comfortable to anyone used to shooting with one of the bigger DSLRs. The control placement is excellent, with a high degree of customization. Unlike many DSLRs, the controls here make sense when using the rear screen or the EVF.

Image stabilization is solid, with body and lens stabilization combining to give up to 8 stops of improvement. Autofocus is based on a whopping 1053 focus points and uses phase detection. Touch selection and tracking via the LCD screen are also present, as you would expect.

Brand Panasonic

Sensor Format Full Frame

Lens Mount Leica L

Megapixels 24 MP

Autofocus Points 225

Minimum ISO 100

Maximum ISO 51,200

Frame Rate 9 fps

Video

Screen Size 3. 2"

×

Panasonic Lumix DC-S1H

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The first thing you might notice from the quick specs above is the 6K video. At the moment, there aren’t many uses for 6K video. But capturing in full 6K gives you the flexibility to edit a 4K crop from a larger scene. This is just one of the benefits of the impressive video recording capabilities of the Lumix DC-S1H.

It’s not the most expensive mirrorless camera, but it is a significant investment. So what does your money buy?

Of course, there is in-camera image stabilization. Combining intelligently with the lens IS, it produces a 6.5-stop improvement. Autofocus is not always the best, but it offers touch focus selection, and face detection and tracking. There are 255 focus points.

The Panasonic Lumix DC-S1H is good to look at and a powerful contender for the best mirrorless camera for video. The Leica L lens mount has the additional attraction of an adapter to open up the field of Canon EF lenses.

What Features Make the Best Mirrorless Cameras for Video?

As well as being smaller than many DSLRs, mirrorless cameras are primarily designed around their LCD screens. You hold them in front of your body rather than pressed to your face. In most circumstances, this is better for video recording and is how you’ll shoot if you are using a stabilizer or gimbal.

What Sensor Size to Choose?

There are three sensor sizes relevant to this review of the best mirrorless cameras.

Full Frame

A full frame camera, equivalent to 35mm film, is necessarily bigger than one with a smaller sensor. They also have a reputation for producing the best image quality. This is partly because they can fit more pixels on their sensors and partly because those pixels have more space to “breathe.”

APS-C

The next size down is the APS-C sensor. This is the stock size for most entry-level DSLR cameras (and some quite sophisticated ones). Nikon, Pentax, Sony, Fujifilm, and others use a 370mm2 APS-C format, while Canon’s version is smaller at 329mm2.

Micro Four Thirds

Finally, we have the 225mm2 Micro Four Thirds sensor. Panasonic, Olympus, and Blackmagic use it in their cameras.

The Micro Four Thirds sensor is only the size of old 110 film. But it is capable of producing impressive image and video quality. They are a world away from your memory of terrible pictures taken with a 110 compact camera.

What Body Style is Best?

A good number of our recommendations today are for mirrorless cameras that look like they have a DSLR. There is the familiar “lump” above the lens, and here is where you find the eyepiece.

But instead of a glass screen, the image from the lens is shown in an electronic viewfinder (EVF). The advantage of this body style is probably most significant for those coming from the DSLR world. It will feel very familiar, and everything is where you expect it to be.

Other cameras, like the Panasonic Lumix DC-S1H, offset the EVF, and you’ll find it at the top-left side of the body. This might take some getting used to, but it frees up the touchscreen LCD panel for Panasonic’s rather nifty interactive functions.

You’re looking for the best mirrorless camera for video recording. So the chances are that you will be using the rear LCD screen for handheld shooting and not the EVF anyway.

What Lens Mount is Best?

The other major factor for consideration is the lens mount. We are evaluating cameras here with interchangeable lenses, and the mount should be a major consideration in your choice.

Obviously, if you have a bag full of Canon lenses, this will probably affect your decision. There are also adapters for using mounts from one system on another. Where this is applicable, our recommendations will indicate this.

Broadly speaking, the major old-school manufacturers like Nikon and Canon have their own stable of lenses. Micro Four Thirds is the unusual case here because it is not just a sensor size, but a lens mount system as well.

Is a Mirrorless Camera Right for You?

Although good-quality DSLRs can be used to shoot top-notch video, that’s not their main purpose.

These mirrorless cameras almost beg to be used for shooting video. Many are also more than capable as still cameras. You’ll find we’ve included a quick appraisal of each camera’s photography capabilities.

Mirrorless cameras offer flexibility and a wide choice of features by many manufacturers. All the cameras featured here have a menu system and stabilization to cope with camera shake.

The trick is to identify your budget and prioritize your needs. Is it low-light performance over a body with built-in image stabilization, or is video quality more important than still images?

Conclusion

The search for the best mirrorless cameras for video can be bewildering. Panasonic alone produces enough mirrorless cameras to leave your head spinning.

If you’re looking for a mirrorless camera that, above all else, will perform superbly with video, then the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH5S is your best choice.

Panasonic Lumix GH5S

A wonderful range of features aimed clearly at the videographer makes this the perfect choice.

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Panasonic Lumix GH5S

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Fujifilm X-T4 review | TechRadar

TechRadar Verdict

The Fujifilm X-T4 is the best APS-C mirrorless camera you can buy right now. There’s enough here to persuade both photographers and filmmakers over the X-T3, including the significantly improved battery life, in-body image stabilization, quieter shutter, and design tweaks that make a big difference to the handling. The X-T4's design is both charming and intuitive, while its class-leading photo and video specs are backed up by powerful performance. This is truly two cameras in one, and very fine hybrid all-rounder.

TODAY'S BEST DEALS

Pros
  • +

    Solid as a rock

  • +

    Class-leading APS-C sensor

  • +

    IBIS is a big bonus for video and stills

  • +

    Good battery life

  • +

    Sensible menu system

Why you can trust TechRadar Our expert reviewers spend hours testing and comparing products and services so you can choose the best for you. Find out more about how we test.

The Fujifilm X-T4 is a mirrorless camera with a split personality – on the outside it's all retro dials and analogue chic, but inside it's packed with more advanced features than we've seen from any Fujifilm X-T camera so far.

It's a compelling combination. Like the Fujifilm X-T3 (which remains on sale), the X-T4 is for keen amateur photographers and pros who want the latest mirrorless power in a fun, desirable package. The difference this time is that the X-T4 has cranked its 'all-rounder' dial up to 11.

The headline news is the inclusion of in-body image stabilization (IBIS), making this only the second Fujifilm camera to have this feature, the other being the Fujifilm X-h2. Both video and stills shooters can benefit from IBIS, and its inclusion here brings the X-T4 up to speed with rivals like the Sony A6600. 

The rest of the X-T4's new features read like a checklist of responses to requests from Fujifilm shutterbugs: a bigger battery (check), improved autofocus (check) and, naturally, a new Film Simulation effect (called Bleach Bypass).  

However, these exciting additions are teamed with the same sensor and processor combo as its predecessor. Which leaves us asking, could you just stick with the Fujifilm X-T3? And what of the video-centric X-h2?

To help clarify that, our review focuses a little more on the X-T4's changes and the impact of those additions. For most other matters, our Fujifilm X-T3 review still applies.

What we will say now is that the Fujifilm X-T4 is one heck of a camera that possesses wonderful charm and immense power under the hood. It's fully deserving of its place in our guide to the best cameras for photography, as well as its inclusion in our guide to the best video camera, and even the best YouTube cameras. Now, more than ever, we have a true photography-video hybrid from Fujifilm.  

(Image credit: Future)
  • Fujifilm X-T4 (Silver) at Amazon for $1,549

Fujifilm X-T4 release date and price

  • The Fujifilm X-T4 is available to buy right now in various bundles
  • Prices start at $1,699 / £1,549  / AU$2,999

The Fujifilm X-T4 is available to buy right now in various bundles. If you just want a body-only X-T4, it costs $1,699 / £1,549 / AU$2,999 in either black or silver.

A bundle with the excellent XF18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS kit lens costs $2,099 / £1,899 / AU$3,298. Or, if you'd rather get the X-T4 with the new XF16-80mm f/4 R OIS WR lens, that will set you back $2,199 / £1,949 / AU$4,099.

If these prices are a bit too steep for you then it's worth noting that the Fujifilm X-T3 will remain on sale for some time yet. That camera now costs $1,299 / £1,199 / AU$1,823, making it a more affordable alternative if you don't need IBIS or any of the X-T4's other new features.

Of course, the Fujifilm X-T4's price means it's now also up at the level of many full-frame cameras, including the Nikon Z6 and Sony A7 III; but while it has a smaller sensor than those cameras, it does also have some superior features, as we'll discover.

Build and handling

  • The Fujifilm X-T4 is slightly larger and heavier than the X-T3
  • Built quality is very solid, though a chunkier handgrip would be nice
  • Its magnesium alloy design is still weather-resistant

Fujifilm doesn't often make dramatic departures from its retro blueprint, and the X-T4 is no different. Let's just say that if you've picked up an X-T series camera before, you'll feel right at home here.

We are fans of the premium Fujifilm X-T ethos. It centers around those bold analogue-style dials on the top plate. The dedicated dials are for ISO, shutter speed and exposure compensation.  

Paired with an aperture ring found in many of Fujfilm's lenses, this provides you with all the key exposure controls at your fingertips. Not only are these dials no slower than using the modern generic control dials, they are arguably more methodical and hands-down more charming.  

If the design of a camera entices you to use it more, then the X-T4 could well be your constant companion. There is definitely an emotional connection for camera fans.

Image 1 of 3

(Image credit: Future)(Image credit: Future)(Image credit: Future)

Build quality is second-to-none. The X-T4’s full-metal body is weather-sealed and solid as a rock. With its new IBIS unit, the X-T4 is a fraction larger and heavier than the X-T3, but at 603g it’s still much lighter compared to an enthusiast-level DSLR.   

A slightly bigger handgrip houses a larger battery unit that boasts almost double the shot life of its predecessor, up to 600-shots in economy mode. It’s a significant step up, plus you have the option of on-the-go charging via the USB-C port. 

A change in size also means a new optional vertical grip. This holds up to three of those new batteries and features a dedicated headphone jack, which is missing on the X-T4 body. A USB-C-to-3.5mm dongle comes in the box to attach headphones, but you won’t therefore be able to charge the camera at the same time. 

For us, the larger handgrip is still simply not big enough. The X-T4 is already a DSLR-style camera, so why not offer an even deeper grip that is more comfortable to hold? That said, it does depend a little on what your favorite lenses are.

The switch under the shutter speed dial no longer controls metering, but moves between Still or Movie shooting. Removing the metering switch will irritate some dedicated photographers, but the change makes complete sense whether you are using the camera for photos or for video.   

Because of this change, new dedicated menu systems are opened up for both Still and Movie shooting. For example, in Still mode the Q menu (or 'quick' menu) and the in-camera menu system only contains photography options. Flick to video and the menus change to video options, plus the analogue dials become inactive.  

To make exposure changes when shooting video, you use the front and rear clicked control dials. These changes can be made during capture and in conjunction with the touchscreen. 

We love the logical separation between the two disciplines and the easy-to-navigate menus. What appears as a minor tweak to the design is indeed a bold move that emphasizes the X-T4's status as a true hybrid camera. 

(Image credit: Future)

Now we come to the LCD touchscreen. The resolution of the 3-inch display is upped to 1.62-million-dots, and now the unit is fully articulated rather than a tilt type.  

With the LCD screen flipped out to the side, it can be rotated and viewed in ’selfie’ mode. A front-facing screen is particularly useful for filmmakers that work alone. The screen can also be safely folded away to reveal a lovely faux-leather finish. We have particularly enjoyed a screen-less experience and focusing on the EVF instead.  

Some say an articulated screen design is more fragile than the tilt-type when flipped out. It can get in the way of the ports on the side of the camera (Fujifilm has redesigned the port covering in the X-T4 as two pull-out rubber doors), plus you are viewing it off-centre and it may not be compatible with an L-Bracket support.  

In the context of the flagship X-T series, we’re on the fence with which screen design we prefer, but it’s no deal-breaker either way. The X-T4 screen slightly favors video, because it's a little trickier than a flip screen when shooting from the hip.   

As before, the X-T4 records onto an SD card and both slots are compatible with the ultra-fast UHS-II type that is needed for high-speed continuous shooting and high-resolution videos.   

(Image credit: Future)

Features and autofocus

  • The Fujifilm X-T4 has five-axis in-body image stabilization
  • This provides up to 6.5 stops of stabilization with certain lenses
  • A new quieter shutter mechanism helps it shoot at up to 15fps

It might look remarkably similar to its X-T predecessors, but the Fujifilm X-T4 is the biggest leap forward for the series yet, thanks to three main new features: IBIS, a new battery, and a new shutter mechanism.

Otherwise, the X-T4's headline features are virtually identical to the X-T3, a camera that is 18 months older. You get the same 26.1MP back illuminated APS-C sensor, which is class-leading in terms of detail and low light performance. If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. 

Then there is a movie shooting spec that stands firm today too; Cinema 4K movies up to 60fps, 10-bit internal recording plus HDMI out, up to 400Mbps bit-rate and with F-Log and HLG profiles included as standard. Slow motion Full HD movies are possible up to 240fps, too. If you want great looking videos, the X-T4 will achieve that.  

The really big news, though, is that in-body image stabilization (IBIS). On paper, the sensor shift unit beats the one in the Fujifilm X-h2 by one stop, providing up to 6.5EV (or exposure value) of stabilization when used with one of Fujifilm’s stabilized lenses. This includes 18 out of Fujifilm's total of 29 lenses and is particularly exciting if you own classic prime lenses like the XF35mm f/1.4 or XF56mm f/1.2.

Image stabilization is of particular interest to run-and-gun filmmakers who want steady handheld shots without relying on a gimbal. We’ll share our experience of it further down in the 'Performance' section.  

The shutter has benefitted from a few improvements – it’s more robust with a 300,000-shot life, it’s quieter than the one in the X-T3 by about 30%, and it’s faster with a new 15fps top speed.  

Of course, this speed isn't particularly helpful if the autofocus can't keep up with the action, and luckily Fujifilm has fine-tuned its AF system for the X-T4 too. Fuji claims that the X-T4's tracking success rate is twice as good as the X-T3, which wasn't exactly a slouch in this department, and the Face / Eye AF has also been improved. You can find our thoughts on this in the 'Performance' section below.

As before, the camera maxes out at 30fps when using the electronic shutter. You get a PreShot mode, interval timer, panorama, HDR, bracketing and a range of advanced filters. Again, Raw images can be edited in-camera and uploaded wirelessly using Fujifilm’s app with Bluetooth, Wi-Fi and NFC connectivity. 

In short, the X-T4 is the most capable hybrid APS-C camera around, bar none. 

(Image credit: Future)

Performance

  • The X-T4 has Fujifilm's best image stabilization system so far
  • Face and Eye detection AF are very impressive for portraits
  • 15fps burst shooting makes it a strong action performer too 

So what is the Fujifilm X-T4's image stabilization actually like? We had the 16-80mm f/4 WR lens for our test, which is listed as obtaining up to 6EV  (or stops) of stabilization when both optical stabilization (OIS) and sensor shift stabilization (IBIS) are active.  

After multiple efforts with a steady hand, we experienced effective stabilization more like 4EV (or four stops). The same can be said of the 35mm f/1.4 lens. We’d be interested to try more lenses, but for photography, those 6.5EV claims might be a little generous. The Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark III stabilization is much better.  

Still, the stabilization for photos is a minor improvement over the X-T3. And it is a game-changer for those using an X-T camera without an optically stabilized lens. 

As for video, the sensor shift stabilization is an improvement on no stabilization at all, obviously. Shake caused by vibrations from walking are reduced, but still evident. This is certainly not the best IBIS we have seen, but it is certainly a bonus over the X-T3.

Activate the digital stabilization in addition to OIS and IBIS and things improve a lot. Shake is almost virtually gone. The trade-off with digital stabilization is that a 1.1x crop factor is applied and somehow the feel of the footage isn’t quite the same.  

In short, the X-T4 IBIS does not completely replace the need for a gimbal, but it is very welcome and the performance is especially good when digital stabilization is added.

Image 1 of 4

Face and Eye detection is very reliable when it comes to acquiring sharp focus on the eyes. (Image credit: Future)In portrait shots the eyes are virtually always pin sharp, even with subjects turning their face in and out of view. (Image credit: Future)The continuous high drive setting of 15fps mechanical shutter increases your chances of capturing the precise moment. (Image credit: Future)The continuous Zone AF mode allows you to isolate an area of the frame for sharp focusing and is very reliable, even in action scenes. (Image credit: Future)

Autofocus is still the 425-point hybrid system that is quick and reliable across a variety of scenarios. However, the autofocus experience does vary depending on the lens in use. For example, we had the older 35mm f/1.4 lens which does not perform to the same standard as the 16-80mm f/4 lens.   

There was a time that AF performance was a weakness of the Fujifilm system. That’s certainly not the case with the X-T4, though you will need a more recent lens to make the most of its powers.  

Fujifilm claims that Face and Eye detection AF is improved. Certainly, we were very impressed with the reliability – in our portrait pictures the eyes are virtually always pin sharp, even in low contrast light and with subjects turning their face in and out of view.  

Tracking AF is linked to the wide AF area only. We actually found the Zone AF mode without tracking gave a higher hit ratio of sharp shots in action sequences.  

The X-T4 also offers an improved 15fps 'continuous high' mode when using the mechanical shutter. Recording at this speed onto a UHS-II card, we have been able to capture 37 Raw images in a burst, or 65 images in JPEG only.  

If you shoot JPEG only in 8fps 'continuous low' mode, the camera will keep shooting sequences well into the hundreds – there’s no real limit.   

In general, the buffer processes those 'continuous high' Raw files in around 20-25 seconds before the camera returns to full performance again, whereas for JPEG-only it’s more like five seconds.  

For action sequences, the X-T4 is truly a very capable performer, but it may not meet the demands of pro action photographers. You will probably want to shoot in 8fps JPEG-only for an uncompromised performance.  

Image quality

Our Fujifilm X-T3 review covers a lot of our thoughts on the X-T4's image quality, but it's worth doing a recap and also noting the positive impact of image stabilization and this camera's enhanced shooting performance.

The X-T4 uses the same 26.1MP APS-C sensor as the X-T3, with the same native ISO 160 to ISO 12,800 range, video resolution and frame-rates.  

We would have no hesitation in using any sensitivity setting up to ISO 6400 because there is no visible sign of luminance noise in well-exposed images. Even the extended ISO 80 to ISO 51,200 range is usable – it’s not just there for the numbers.   

The bottom line is that no other camera in this class matches the X-T4 (and X-T3’s) low light performance or resolved detail (depending which lens you use). If you want excellent quality photos, the X-T4 will not disappoint. 

Image 1 of 11

The Fujifilm X-T4 boasts class-leading low light performance, although we really pushed the camera here, underexposing at ISO 6400. (Image credit: Future)This two-minute long exposure was taken using the timed (T) setting on the shutter speed dial where exposure times up to 15 minutes are available. (Image credit: Future)The 26.1-million-pixel sensor is able to produce fine detail with the 16-80mm f/4 lens. (Image credit: Future)The 26.1-million-pixel sensor is able to produce fine detail with the 35mm f/1.4 lens. (Image credit: Future)Noise is well controlled in this flower picture taken at ISO 1600, f/5, 1/200sec. (Image credit: Future)The vari-angle screen assists awkward shooting angles and enabled clear viewing with the camera held over the water. (Image credit: Future)In this handheld shot at an equivalent focal length of 120mm and a shutter speed of 1/10sec, detail is sharp thanks to the combination of OIS and IBIS. (Image credit: Future)The standard (Provia) film simulation mode has a pleasing natural color rendition. (Image credit: Future)The new Eterna Bleach Bypass film simulation has a high-contrast and desaturated look well suited to gritty industrial scenes like this. (Image credit: Future)The evaluative metering is reliable in most situations, yet in this instance negative exposure compensation was quickly employed to ensure the highlight detail remained. (Image credit: Future)With a wide dynamic range, the X-T4 maintains plenty of shadow and highlight detail in high-contrast scene like this, plus a dynamic range boost is applied to all JPEGs. (Image credit: Future)

We’re big fans of the 'color science’ behind Fujifilm’s unique sensor design. Each color profile (or ‘film simulation’) references Fujifilm's film stock. The standard ‘Provia' profile has a lovely natural look to it, while Eterna is a staff favorite too.  

Monochrome shooters are well catered for, too. Acros with Red filter makes the skies pop in landscapes decorated with blue skies and intermittent cloud.   

A new color profile called Eterna Bleach Bypass has been added, offering a high-contrast, desaturated look. It’s not our favorite, but we’ll leave it up to you what you think of the new profile. There are 12 color profiles in all now and these can be applied in-camera to Raw files. 

In video mode, you get Cinema 4K videos up to 60fps and up to 400Mpbs, depending on the frame-rate. There are F-Log and HLG color profiles included at any of those settings. We’ve shot some lovely looking video clips in the F-Log profile that only really needed a contrast and vibrancy tweak for a great looking grade.  

It’s worth knowing that ISO 640 is the lowest sensitivity setting available in F-Log profile, making an ND filter a mandatory extra if you want to shoot with the log profile.   

Overall, it's fair to say that outright image quality is definitely a strength of the X-T4. 

(Image credit: Future)

Verdict

The Fujifilm X-T4 is now the best APS-C camera you can buy.

It's an attractive, robust camera with analogue dials that both stand out from the crowd and work incredibly efficiently. This means it particularly appeals to those who love camera gear as much as taking pictures.

Not that it isn't also great at doing the latter. Beyond its aesthetics, the X-T4 boasts unparalleled photo and video performance (at least among APS-C cameras), ticking all of the boxes that matter the most.

The X-T4 is also more than a X-T3 with IBIS. You get a much higher capacity battery, more robust shutter and some design changes that make complete sense for a hybrid camera.  

Yes, almost all of the changes improve video capacity. But photographers are not left behind, benefitting from that better battery life, improved stabilization for non-stabilized lenses, plus a menu system and controls that are clearly distinguished for photo or video use.   

We feel that there is enough in the X-T4 to merit the extra cost over the X-T3. Though it is still worth considering the latter and watching its price – if IBIS is the main feature you're after, you could use the savings to buy an X-T3 with a gimbal. There are also no image quality improvements aside from the impact of the X-T4's enhanced power. 

In its own right, the X-T4 claims the crown of the best mirrorless camera with an APS-C sensor you can buy. It’s two powerful cameras in one, both of which you'll have great fun using for many years to come. 

The competition

Image 1 of 1

(Image credit: Future)
Sony A6600

Fujifilm and Sony use a very different approach for their flagship APS-C mirrorless cameras. The Sony A6600 is lighter and much more compact than the X-T4, consequently offering a comparatively modest built-in viewfinder and tilt LCD screen. The viewing experience is better in the chunkier X-T4, with an articulated LCD screen and larger viewfinder. Performance wise, the A6600 has a better battery life and arguably superior tracking AF, while image quality for photo and video is fractionally better in the X-T4 and you get dual UHS-II SD card slots. At this level, the X-T4 ethos makes more sense.

Read our in-depth Sony A6600 review  

  • Check out our guide to the world's best cameras for photography
  • These are the best mirrorless cameras in the world

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Tim Coleman has enjoyed more than 15 years in the photo industry. Image maker, writer, camera-kit reviewer and video producer, Tim was part of the team at Amateur Photographer Magazine for three years as Deputy Technical Editor and then worked as Editor for Vanguard Europe. Currently, he freelances for numerous photo titles alongside video production for Studio 44 and volunteering for a non-profit in East Africa. 

Best Mirrorless Video Cameras | Articles | Photo, video, optics

Twenty years ago, movies (and all sorts of small forms such as clips or advertisements) were filmed on a "big black camera" weighing 10 kilos and costing 10 million. Today, small but powerful mirrorless cameras are more often used for shooting video. Read about the best cameras for shooting video in this material.

Since cameras have been able to shoot decent video, they have been used to shoot commercial videos, commercials, TV series and movies. Due to the large matrix, they allow you to get a beautiful "cine" picture with a beautifully blurred background and low noise. At the same time, the camera is much cheaper than specialized film cameras. nine0003

Fuji X-T4 mirrorless camera with cine lens, compendium and external recorder / Photo: fujifilm-x.com

Mirrorless models with interchangeable lenses are the best choice for video shooting. There are universal models that shoot both photos and videos equally well, and there are specialized models that focus on video shooting.

In order to shoot video with high quality and without unnecessary problems, the camera must have a number of functions:

  • 4K shooting. Today, the standard for video shooting is 4K resolution - that is, about 4000 pixels along the long side of the image. Shooting in 4K is also good because it allows you to have a technical margin in case the final video is used in FHD (Full HD,1920x1080). In this case, the video can be cropped and stabilized without loss of quality;
  • microphone input. The microphone built into the camera is hardly enough for professional tasks. It is better to have a separate input, into which you can connect a directional microphone, a radio buttonhole receiver or even an on-camera mixer with 2 microphone inputs;
  • headphone jack. If you were writing a two-hour interview, it would be sad to come home and find that there was no sound for half of the shooting, because the batteries in the microphone were dead. It is better to hear immediately when shooting that everything is in order with the sound, there are no interference, cod and wind noise. For filming where it is important to control the sound quality, it is better to choose a camera with a headphone output; nine0014
  • stabilizer. Camera-shift stabilizer built into the camera allows you to shoot handheld and get a smooth image without shaking;
  • extended dynamic range. In order to get well-developed details in both highlights and shadows in the final video, image profiles with extended dynamic range are used. This can be a flat profile (such as Nikon Flat), a logarithmic profile (such as Sony S-Log3), or HDR video in HLG format;

Logarithmic profile (left) preserves highlight and shadow detail but requires color grading later / Photo: sony.com

  • easy-to-edit codecs. By default, almost any modern camera shoots video with the H.264 codec, 4:2:0 color sampling and 8 bits per channel color depth. This is great if you need to save space on a memory card and immediately put the footage on the Internet. But if the video is intended for editing and color correction, problems may arise. But just because of the compression, even a powerful computer will start to slow down if you put a video in the H.264 codec into the video editor and start working with it. This is due to the fact that you have to decompress the video back. Therefore, more suitable codecs are used for editing - for example, Apple ProRes. nine0014

You can, of course, convert everything captured on your computer, and only then get to work. But you can save time if the camera can immediately shoot in ProRes. In addition, for color correction it is important to maintain smooth color transitions without posterization. For this, it would be good to have at least 10 bits per channel and 4:2:2 color sampling (even better - 12 bits and 4:4:4).

The number of bits is responsible for the number of shades that the video can store and output during color correction. The same story as with RAW and JPEG for photos: RAW stores more information, which allows for more variable processing. So here. Color sampling is also responsible for the amount of hue that can be extracted from a video during color grading. The larger the last digit, the more color margin; nine0003

  • focus peaking and zebra. On the small screen of a mirrorless camera, it's hard to know if everything is in order with the exposure and where exactly the focus is. Therefore, a good camera will help you understand if everything is in order with your video. Focus peaking will highlight what is currently in focus with a bright color. And in order to avoid overexposure, it is worth turning on the “zebra”, and a hint in the form of hatching will appear in too bright areas;

The cameras in this section are specially designed for video recording. Usually, in such cameras, the photo capabilities are either severely curtailed or ordinary, but in this case the cost of the camera increases significantly. nine0003

Sony Alpha 7S III

The entire Sony 7S line of cameras is designed primarily for shooting video, and the Sony Alpha 7S III is the latest model in this line.

Small mirrorless camera with great potential / Photo: fotosklad.ru

Sony Alpha 7S III specifications:

  • video format: 4K up to 120 fps, FHD up to 240 fps;
  • stabilizer: yes;
  • microphone input: 3.5 mm;
  • headphone output: 3.5 mm;
  • color profiles: S-Log2, S-Log3, HLG; nine0014
  • codecs and color: can write 4:2:2 10bit to memory card, 16bit ProRes Raw to external recorder;
  • shooting aids: focus peaking, focusing magnifier, zebra pattern.

The camera uses a full-frame sensor with a resolution of only 12 MP. For photography today, this is not enough. But the fewer pixels on the matrix, the larger each of them and the more light enters it. Thanks to this, the Sony Alpha 7S III can produce a decent picture with low noise even at high ISO values. The working range of the camera is ISO 80-102400, and can be extended up to ISO 409600.

Sony mirrorless can record 4K video at up to 120 frames per second, which means that during editing these frames can be slowed down by 4-5 times. Native Sony microphones can be connected directly to the multifunctional hot shoe with an additional digital interface, while third-party microphones have a standard 3.5 mm jack.

CFexpress Type A memory cards can record video at 10-bit color depth and 4:2:2 color sampling, and if you connect an external recorder, you can record 16-bit RAW video. nine0003

Very comfortable zebra pattern with adjustable sensitivity. It is important that the lightest areas are not overexposed - set the sensitivity to 95%. Is it important that human faces are properly exposed? Reduce the sensitivity of the "zebra" to 70-75%.

Need to get a frame without overexposure? Reduce exposure until the streaks disappear / Photo: johnmeephotography.com

Panasonic Lumix DC-S1H

Panasonic full-frame mirrorless camera. Similar to its fellow Lumix DC-S1 and DC-S1R, but with more video capabilities. nine0003

An additional video recording button (large red) is visible on the front of the camera / Photo: www.panasonic.com , FHD up to 120 fps;

  • stabilizer: yes;
  • microphone input: 3.5 mm;
  • headphone output: 3.5 mm;
  • color profiles: V-Log, HLG;
  • codecs and color: can write 4:2:2 10bit to memory card when shooting 4K, 4:2:0 when shooting 6K; nine0014
  • shooting aids: focus peaking, focusing magnifier, zebra pattern, vectorscope.
  • Mirrorless can write 6K video directly to a memory card, and uses the more common and less expensive SD format. For normal operation, it is better to take cards with a fast UHS-II interface. Prolonged video work causes the camera to become very hot, and to avoid overheating (which can increase noise in the video and even cause the camera to turn off), the Lumix DC-S1H has a built-in fan for forced cooling. nine0003

    Despite the presence of ventilation holes, the camera remains protected from dust and splashes. If you need to shoot 50 or 60 fps, the camera will only use the central part of the sensor, and the field of view will become narrower.

    There is a full size HDMI connector. You can connect an external recorder to it, and write 12-bit RAW video to it. The USB type-C port allows you to power the camera while working from a power bank or compatible charger. nine0003

    Panasonic Lumix GH6

    Another Panasonic mirrorless camera, this time with a Micro 4/3 sensor.

    The GH series has long been loved by videographers for its wide video capabilities / Photo: panasonic. com

    Panasonic Lumix GH6 specifications:

    • video format: 5.7K up to 30 fps, 4K up to 120 fps, FHD up to 300 fps with;
    • stabilizer: yes;
    • microphone input: 3.5 mm;
    • headphone output: 3.5 mm;
    • color profiles: V-Log, HLG; nine0014
    • codecs and color: ProRes HQ 4:2:2 in 5.7K and 4K, Apple ProRes RAW 12bit to external recorder.

    The camera is very similar to the previous one, Lumix DC-S1H - there is also a built-in fan to cool the camera, there is also an additional video recording button on the front panel. The camera features a Micro 4/3 format matrix and wider video capabilities compared to the full-frame model.

    New tilt-and-turn screen design allows you to rotate the camera screen without hitting connected cables / Photo: photojoseph.com

    The Panasonic Lumix GH6 mirrorless camera lets you record 5.7K and 4K video directly to your memory card using Apple's professional ProRes codec. The video bitrate can reach 800 Mb/s. To handle this amount of information, the camera uses CFexpress Type B cards.

    You can also use external media - you can connect an external recorder to the HDMI connector, and an external SSD drive to the USB type C port.

    Producers also took into account the fashion for vertical video. Now you do not need to rotate the video in the editor if you shoot stories on a mirrorless camera. Metadata records information about the position of the camera, and the video will immediately display correctly. nine0003

    Micro 4/3 open standard mount makes the camera available with a variety of Panasonic and third-party lenses.

    The cameras in this section are equally well suited for photography and video content production. They may not be able to shoot video for hours without a break or write 6K, but if you work with both photos and video, it makes sense to take a closer look at the cameras from this section.

    Nikon Z 6 II

    Nikon's 24-megapixel mirrorless camera is capable of recording 4K and Full HD video, as befits a modern mirrorless camera. nine0003

    Nikon Z6 II mirrorless camera with external recorder / Photo: broadcastbeat.com

    Nikon Z 6 II specifications:

    • video format: 4K up to 60 fps, FHD up to 120 fps;
    • stabilizer: yes;
    • microphone input: 3.5 mm;
    • headphone output: 3.5 mm;
    • color profiles: N-Log, HLG, Flat;
    • codecs and color: Apple ProRes RAW 12 bit to external recorder.

    Video Nikon Z6 II writes decent, but can not boast of outstanding capabilities. When recording 4K from the entire width of the matrix, the frame rate is limited to 30 fps. If you need 60 fps, the camera uses only the central part of the matrix, turning into a cropped one. nine0003

    Only 8-bit 4:2:0 video can be recorded on the memory card, and only Flat is available from color profiles. Advanced features - log profile, 4:2:2 video recording and HDR video in HLG format are only possible when using an external recorder.

    And for this, you will have to take the camera to a service center for a firmware update for an additional fee.

    Fujifilm X-T3

    For fans of retro design and film colors, there are Fuji cameras. nine0003

    See the little mirrorless? And it is there / Photo: www.eoshd.com

    Features Fujifilm X-T3:

    • video format: 4K up to 60 fps, FHD up to 120 fps;
    • stabilizer: no;
    • microphone input: 3.5 mm;
    • headphone output: 3.5 mm;
    • color profiles: F-Log, Eterna;
    • codecs and color: 10 bits per external recorder.

    Fuji cameras are loved for their interesting color profiles that mimic the colors of actual Fujifilm film. You can also use them when shooting video (including the specially designed Eterna profile with reduced contrast for video shooting). nine0003

    Fujifilm X-T3 can shoot 4K video up to 30 fps without crop and up to 60 fps with a small crop of 1.18 and can write 10-bit 4:2:0 video to a memory card. And in addition to the standard photo lenses for the Fuji X mount, there is also a special series of cinema lenses.

    Fujifilm is one of the world's leading manufacturers of cine optics / Photo: fujifilm.com

    Unfortunately, there is no stabilizer in the camera. So if you want to shoot handheld, use a lens with built-in IS

    If your budget is tight and you want to shoot right now, take a look at the cameras in this section. They may not have sophisticated features and a weatherproof metal case, but they still make good video.

    Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III

    The small Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III mirrorless camera is one of the most affordable options recommended for beginner video content creators.

    One of the smallest 4K mirrorless cameras / Photo: trustedreviews.com

    Specifications OM-D E-M10 Mark III:

    • Video format: 4K up to 30 fps, FHD up to 60 fps;
    • stabilizer: yes;
    • microphone input: no;
    • headphone output: no;
    • color profiles: no specific video profiles;
    • codecs and color: standard H. 264 8 bit 4:2:0 only.

    The camera does not boast rich features: there are neither logarithmic profiles nor a headphone output. And if you need to record sound, you will have to buy an external recorder - there is no microphone input in the camera either. But at the same time, the camera shoots pretty decent 4K video, and the Micro 4/3 mount allows you to use both native lenses and inexpensive manual ones from China. And you can buy an adapter and put the secular "Helios" or "Jupiter" on the mirrorless mirror. nine0003

    In-camera stabilizer will work with any of the lenses, and focus peaking will help you focus even without autofocus.

    Panasonic LUMIX DMC-G7

    Another Micro 4/3 sensor camera. Slightly more advanced than the previous Olympus, the Lumix G7 has a microphone jack, and a right-hand protrusion makes it easier to hold the camera.

    Panasonic Lumix G7 looks pretty solid, you can already go to commercial shooting with it / Photo: gadgetreview. com

    LUMIX DMC-G7 specifications:

    • video format: 4K up to 30 fps, FHD up to 60 fps
    • stabilizer: no no special profiles for video recording
    • codecs and color: only standard H.264 8 bit 4:2:0

    In other respects, the camera does not reach the older brothers from the GH-series, but it also costs noticeably cheaper than them.

    The best video cameras | Articles | Photo, video, optics


    Source: bhphotovideo.com

    As the years go by, video has become an increasingly important creative tool and means of communicating information, and video recording features have become one of the deciding factors when choosing a new camera, not only for videographers, but also for photographers.

    Fortunately, many cameras these days have very advanced movie features. What began as simple 640 x 480 pixel videos a few years ago, more like animated GIFs, has evolved into a truly advanced technology that can compete in image quality with specialized video equipment. Below is a list of cameras that, along with excellent photos, allow you to shoot really high-quality video. nine0003

    Our choice: Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5S and DC-GH5

    Both versions of the Lumix DC-GH5 camera from Panasonic were chosen as the winner. The Panasonic GH5 and GH5S support UHD and DCI 4K video at 60p (with 10-bit 4:2:2 chroma subsampling available in some modes) and offer a wider range of moviemaking tools than most of their closest competitors. This includes both the vectorscope and oscilloscopes, as well as zebra, focus peaking, and on-screen live preview for anamorphic and Log shooting. For many photographers, most of these terms may not be familiar, but videographers use these tools all the time in their work. nine0003

    Equipped with a slightly larger dual gain sensor (allows for noise reduction at higher ISOs), the GH5S captures beautiful video in a wider range of lighting conditions than the regular GH5. This, plus the flexible handling of its 10-bit Log footage (the GH5's VLog-L is only available at an additional cost), makes the GH5S our go-to camera for video.

    Instead, the standard GH5 offers built-in sensor-shift image stabilization. This is a more reliable choice for everyday shooting without special training and a tripod, as well as for just "watering" (as videographers sometimes say), that is, shooting everything around and indiscriminately. The 20-megapixel sensor makes this model the best option for taking photos in addition to videos. Autofocus of both models is not very reliable in video mode - this is perhaps the main disadvantage of both models. nine0003

    We'll take a closer look at the GH5 and GH5S separately below.

    Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5

    Key Features:

    20-megapixel MFT-format CMOS sensor.

    3.68 million dot OLED viewfinder

    4K/60p video.

    Pros:

    • Professional video features.
    • Magnesium alloy housing with weather protection. nine0014
    • Excellent viewfinder and movable touch screen.

    Minuses:

    • Autofocus in the video sometimes prowls.
    • Viewfinder resolution drops during high-speed shooting.

    Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5 is a hybrid camera suitable for stills and video, but still more interesting in terms of video shooting. Its 20-megapixel MFT-format sensor captures 4K video at 60p, with professional-grade features such as 4:2:2 chroma subsampling and 10-bit color. nine0003

    The GH5 is large enough for a Micro 4:3 camera, yet has excellent ergonomics and a weatherproof housing. There is a dual SD card slot, a handy joystick for menus and autofocus, and an excellent electronic viewfinder.

    Autofocus is great for photos, but in video mode it sometimes lurks and, in general, its implementation lags behind competitor systems.

    The GH5 utilizes the full width of the sensor to capture super-sharp 4K video at up to 60p. The GH5 can record 4:2:2 10-bit footage to a memory card, capturing twice the color information and 64 times the color depth of cameras shooting 4:2:0 8-bit video. The model received a whole set of professional tools, including vectorscopes and oscilloscopes, and the VLog-L profile is available as a paid upgrade. An advanced image stabilization system makes it easy to shoot video handheld. nine0003

    From a photographic point of view, the image quality of the camera is excellent, with pleasingly rich colors. RAW files are very detailed, and the camera matrix allows you to effectively pull out the details in the shadows.

    GH5 is more versatile than DC-GH5S. It offers excellent video performance as well as highly advanced still photography.

    Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5S

    Key Features:

    10.3-megapixel CMOS sensor with various aspect ratios. nine0003

    DCI/UHD 4K video at 60p.

    3.68 million dot electronic viewfinder.

    Pros :

    • Shoots DCI 4K at 60p.
    • Extended set of movie shooting functions.
    • Matrix with different aspect ratios.

    Cons:

    • No image stabilization.
    • Autofocus in video is not very reliable.
    • Poor photo resolution by today's standards. nine0014

    The DC-GH5S is a video-focused hybrid photo/video camera from the GH series. She received a matrix optimized for 4K, which allows you to shoot UHD and DCI video at speeds up to 60p. However, this larger chip, which maintains its field of view in both formats, did not allow the camera to use the built-in image stabilization system.

    The body and controls of the DC-GH5S and GH5 are the same: a DSLR-style body with many customizable buttons and an extended touch interface for silent video operation. The GH5S is also one of the few cameras with oscilloscopes (waveforms). nine0003

    The camera's autofocus is not bad enough, but not 100% reliable: focus may jitter and the subject may be lost during tracking.

    The GH5S produces very impressive video, with a good level of detail in a wide range of lighting conditions. 10-bit shooting along with V-Log L and Hybrid Log modes provide good flexibility for subsequent color grading. 60p and 50p 4K can be recorded to a memory card in 8-bit or output via HDMI in 10-bit. nine0003

    Photo-wise, the JPEGs look quite good, with much better color than older Panasonic models, and the RAW files have enough dynamic range to justify the addition of 14-bit footage. However, in general, a video-optimized sensor does not provide the photo detail that we expect from advanced cameras today.

    The GH5S delivers some of the best video on the market for hybrid photo/video cameras. In addition to picture quality, the model boasts a large set of professional video tools. Weaknesses include the lack of built-in stabilization, as well as not the most reliable autofocus. nine0003

    Alternate choice: Fujifilm X-T3

    Key Features:

    26-megapixel APS-C X-Trans BSI-CMOS sensor.

    4K/60p video.

    Touch screen, 2-axis inclined.

    Pros:

    • High quality 10-bit 4K video.
    • Excellent RAW and JPEG photos.
    • Convenient customizable controls.

    Cons:

    • No built-in stabilization.
    • No AF tracking in video.
    • f/1.4 lenses may focus slowly.

    The Fujifilm X-T3 has made our lists of the best cameras on numerous occasions, which is not surprising, because Fujifilm has managed to create a truly versatile model that is perfect for a variety of tasks. And video recording is no exception.

    While the GH5 and GH5S offer more advanced video features and a wider range of additional tools, the Fujifilm X-T3 is not only more versatile, but also cheaper. nine0003

    Fujifilm's mirrorless camera can shoot 4K video at up to 60p in 10-bit for post-processing flexibility. In addition, its video autofocus system performs well in a wide range of shooting situations.

    In addition to top video performance, X-T3 also boasts excellent photos. Its 26-megapixel BSI CMOS sensor produces excellent RAW and JPEG images with some of the best color reproduction on the market.

    It also features a set of traditional, highly customizable controls that make it easy to switch between stills and movies. The only tangible disadvantage for video shooting is the lack of a built-in stabilization system. All in all, the X-T3 is one of the most interesting APS-C still and video cameras on the market today. nine0003

    Other options

    Canon EOS M6 Mark II

    Key Features:

    32. 5 megapixel APS-C sensor.

    Continuous shooting 14 fps.

    4K/30p video.

    Pros:

    • Very good image quality.
    • The Dual Pixel AF system provides good focusing speed and accuracy.
    • Compact but with a good range of controls. nine0014

    Cons:

    • Limited battery life.
    • USB charging only with dedicated PD adapters.
    • 4K video is not as detailed as the competition.

    Where previous models were more of a choice for professional videographers who know how to use specialized tools and are ready for post-production with color grading, the Canon EOS M6 Mark II is a simpler and more beginner-friendly video camera. nine0003

    This 32MP APS-C mirrorless camera features a compact body, Dual Pixel autofocus system and 4K video capture.

    Despite its small size, the M6 ​​Mark II has a comfortable grip and a full range of physical controls in addition to a user-friendly touch interface.

    The autofocus system performs well in both stills and movies, with convenient and effective subject tracking and eye/face detection.

    Of course, 4K video is a lot less detailed than previous models, and even slightly worse than some of the direct competitors in the mid-budget mirrorless camp, but the handy touch autofocus makes it one of the most comfortable cameras for shooting amateur video. The camera also allows you to easily switch between photo and video modes with different settings for each mode.

    In terms of photography, the 32.5-megapixel sensor performs well in terms of noise, dynamic range and resolution. nineThe 0003

    M6 II is a great choice for amateur videography, and overall a versatile camera that's comfortable and fun to shoot with.

    Nikon Z6

    Key Features:

    24-megapixel full-frame BSI-CMOS sensor.

    Integrated image stabilization.

    UHD 4K/30p video.

    Pros:

    • Great photos and 4K video.
    • Excellent build quality.
    • nine0013 High quality 3.69 million dot OLED viewfinder.

    Cons:

    • Overly aggressive high ISO noise reduction.
    • Small delays in the viewfinder make it difficult to shoot fast subjects.
    • Not the most capacious battery.
    The

    Nikon Z6, like the X-T3, has already made it to our best camera lists, last time it was the best cameras for Instagram and lifestyle photography. Unsurprisingly, both cameras are also great options for shooting video, as versatility is one of their strengths. nine0003

    This is an entry-level full-frame mirrorless camera with a weather-resistant body and built-in image stabilization.

    Z6 allows you to shoot 4K/30p video with excellent detail and tracking autofocus. The camera can also output 10-bit video via HDMI to an external recorder.

    The quality of photos in the camera is also at the highest level, the only drawback is too much noise reduction at high ISOs in JPEG.

    The combination of excellent photo and video quality makes the Z6 another interesting option for hobby videographers. nine0003

    Sony Alpha a7 III

    Key Features:

    24-megapixel full-frame BSI-CMOS sensor.

    Hybrid autofocus system.

    Integrated image stabilization.

    Pros:

    • High quality photo and video.
    • Superb autofocus.
    • Excellent battery life.

    Cons:

    • Limited functionality of the touch interface. nine0014
    • Confusing menu;
    • Viewfinder resolution not very high.

    Launched two years ago, the Sony a7 III continues to be one of the most interesting full-frame mirrorless cameras on the market, thanks in part to its excellent video quality and excellent range of advanced video tools.

    This is still one of the most compact full-frame mirrorless cameras out there and works great with smaller lenses - larger lenses are a little off balance. The menu system and control customization can create difficulties in the early stages of using the camera due to its complexity. The touch interface in the model is not implemented in the best way, and the resolution of the viewfinder at the moment seems too small. On the other hand, the camera provides a very decent 710 shots per battery charge, and the autofocus system with 693 dots on the matrix covers most of the frame. There is also an eye recognition system.

    In terms of video recording, the camera offers very detailed 4K full-sensor readout when shooting at 24p. There is a 1.2x crop at 30p, but the detail is still great. The model offers many additional tools, including zebra and focus picking, as well as Log profiles.


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